Object quiz

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gregory23b
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Object quiz

Post by gregory23b »

What are these objects?

1) what is it and where is it from?

2) what is it and what would you do with it?

3) What is is this? And where would you find it?
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whatisit1.jpg
whatisit2.jpg
whatisit3.jpg
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tonw
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Post by tonw »

number 2 is a weight from a warp weighted loom found all over the place from something like 800 AD onwards
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Post by Wolf in Shadow »

1.Is part of an italian fifteen century painting.Cant remember which one,but this mirror refects what is being paibnted.I seem to recall that it shoudl be showing the artist.But it doesn't.
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Post by Dickie »

By sheer coincidence (Ibought 2 Saturday) I think the third piccie is Darth Tater!

The Spud is strong with this one..!

The Mirror as Mr in-Shadow says is from a painting, it does show the artist, in the far background, 'Man and his Wife'..?
Last edited by Dickie on Mon Sep 05, 2005 4:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by gregory23b »

Tonw - yes for Number 2. or spindle whorl

Wolf - kind of, almost there, certainly in terms of an Italian connection and other details.

Dickie - again close but not so illustrious.
Last edited by gregory23b on Mon Sep 05, 2005 4:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Dickie »

Cross posted my update, you see I knew those that History of Art 'A' Level would come in handy, lords if I can remember the artist, not Titian is it, he liked 'odd' bits in his portraits...

In which case its 'Spud Trooper', my daughter is v lucky, her birthday is 1st October (Darth Tater) so guess what will be in the Xmas stocking from Santa..?
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Post by gregory23b »

Yep Spud trooper, cannon fodder, but for the geeks out there what part of the outfit? No bonus points.
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Post by PaulMurphy »

Number one is the mirror detail from the Arnolfini Wedding, by Van Eyck, which just made the top 5 list of art in the UK on Radio 4. An excellent piece all round... and no art qualifications for me. Its not even from my period of interest, and yet I find it strangely compelling.

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Post by gregory23b »

Yay, Paul gets all the parts, cool.

Some art historians call this the Arnolfini Double Portrait too as it is not actually 100% known if it is a wedding portrait (although that seems to work), had someone said that I would have marked them for it.
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Post by Vicky »

I've a friend who insists on calling it the Arnold Finney Wedding photo!

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Post by honey bun »

What am I doing wrong, I can't see the pictures :cry:

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Post by gregory23b »

You are a guest, at least that is what it says on your nameplate.
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Post by Cat »

About the Arnolfini Marriage, I watched a programme recently that put a good case for it being a posthumous pic of the lady. Apparently you can 'read' some of the accessories as pointing to the lady being no longer alive. (Was outside shoes being present in the pic one of them? I know that they symbolise demise if not being worn. )Something to do with the window? and the fact that the bed was in the pic, and that the mirror was used in the way it was.

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Post by strumpet »

Aaahhh symbolism, I've just been studying this and in fact used this picture amongst others as an example of the influences that the 15th century masters had on Grant Woods art.

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Post by El gone to Cid »

Nah. Number 1 is the front sprocket off my old Honda 400. :D
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Post by breccamerie »

The scene in the painting is of Giovanni and his bride taking their marriage vows, thus the shoes have been removed because the sacrament of matrimony makes the room a holy place. The dog symbolizes fidelity (Fido-to trust), the curtains of the marriage bed have been opened, the finial of the bedpost is a tiny statue of St. Margaret, patron saint of childbirth. The whisk broom hanging on the finial symbolizes domestic care, oranges on the chest below the window may refer to the golden apples of Hesperides which may represent the conquest of death and the presence of the omnivoyant eye of God seems to be reffered to twice; once in the singe burning candle and in the ornate chandelier and again by the mirror for which the entire room is reflected. Small medallions set into the mirror's frame show tiny scenes fro the Passion of Christ and represent van Eyck's ever present promise of salvation for the figures reflected on the mirror's convex surface. Two persons look into the room from the door, for which one may be the artist himself. 'Johannes de Eyck fuit hic' announces that he was present. The portain of the painting that has been included in this forum is actually the reflection in the mirror behind the couple and for this reason we only see the back of their heads. In my art history class their was discussion about the bride being pregnant due to her rather huge belly. I also heard something about this being post-death, but can't remember the details. During this time it was common to include symbolism such as a human skull or a bowl of fruit to symbolise mortality. The oranges which may be symbolic of death might be just such an occasion, a reminder of mortality rather than a posthumous painting. Hope this helps a bit. Any one interested in the complete painting can probably find it with a good search on line. Look for Jan van Eyck's 'Giovanni Arnolfini and His Bride', 1434- a painting from around the same time as Bosch's 'Garden of Earthly Delights'. Go check out the symbolism in that one!
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Post by gregory23b »

Thanks Brecchiamarie, it was a quiz.

The portrait is as you say readily available on line to look at.

Notably it is not always referred to as the Arnolfini Wedding, but in some cases the Arnolfini Double Portrait.

So what are the other two items then?
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Post by nev »

don't know but i love his hat! does anyone out there make them? and if so how much?
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Post by Medicus Matt »

breccamerie wrote:The scene in the painting is of Giovanni and his bride taking their marriage vows, thus the shoes have been removed because the sacrament of matrimony makes the room a holy place. The dog symbolizes fidelity (Fido-to trust), the curtains of the marriage bed have been opened, the finial of the bedpost is a tiny statue of St. Margaret, patron saint of childbirth. The whisk broom hanging on the finial symbolizes domestic care, oranges on the chest below the window may refer to the golden apples of Hesperides which may represent the conquest of death and the presence of the omnivoyant eye of God seems to be reffered to twice; once in the singe burning candle and in the ornate chandelier and again by the mirror for which the entire room is reflected. Small medallions set into the mirror's frame show tiny scenes fro the Passion of Christ and represent van Eyck's ever present promise of salvation for the figures reflected on the mirror's convex surface. Two persons look into the room from the door, for which one may be the artist himself. 'Johannes de Eyck fuit hic' announces that he was present. The portain of the painting that has been included in this forum is actually the reflection in the mirror behind the couple and for this reason we only see the back of their heads. In my art history class their was discussion about the bride being pregnant due to her rather huge belly. I also heard something about this being post-death, but can't remember the details. During this time it was common to include symbolism such as a human skull or a bowl of fruit to symbolise mortality. The oranges which may be symbolic of death might be just such an occasion, a reminder of mortality rather than a posthumous painting. Hope this helps a bit. Any one interested in the complete painting can probably find it with a good search on line. Look for Jan van Eyck's 'Giovanni Arnolfini and His Bride', 1434- a painting from around the same time as Bosch's 'Garden of Earthly Delights'. Go check out the symbolism in that one!


Funny, that's exactly what it says here too...http://www.qohs.org/depts/fpa/art/art_h ... enteen.htm
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Post by gregory23b »

Check thy PMs oh master medicus.

and email sprobably too.,
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Post by madjon »

whats the third one looks like two china buttons and a fish tail?

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Post by gregory23b »

Use the force and you will discover the truth.

Or failing that read some of the previous posts.

I feel like another quiz coming on, maybe with a prize.
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