Tudor bonnets

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Angie
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Tudor bonnets

Postby Angie » Tue May 28, 2013 9:47 pm

I went to sealed knot do this weekend and was suprised to see a lot of the women wearing tudor bonnets. Can any one please tell me were they about in the civil war period or had they stopped being worn earlier, is this just a knotism?

Also partlets were worn by some women. I thought that this was a tudor thing or very early 17th century.

Can any body enlighten me?


There was a young woman from Wantage, to whom the town clerk took advantage,Said the Borough surveyor "Indeed you must pay 'er, you've totally altered her frontage"

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Re: Tudor bonnets

Postby frances » Wed May 29, 2013 8:46 pm

When you say Tudor bonnet do you mean a round flat cap in wool or some dark colour, or a white linen under-cap with a hat on top?

A partlet is the tudor 'woolly jumper'. It keeps the shoulders and chest warm where it would otherwise be exposed to the weather. When it is warm you can take it off and cover yourself for modesty with a linen collar or kerchief. I'm not sure how common they were with the upper classes in the mid 17th century, (very common embroidered in the earlier part), but I expect the working classes found them far too useful to discard just because fashion had changed. Maybe someone who knows more about the history of the partlet will come along and give an opinion.



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Angie
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Re: Tudor bonnets

Postby Angie » Wed May 29, 2013 9:06 pm

Yes the bonnets I mean are the round woolen ones with a small brim.

The items a few of the women were wearing were a square piece of linen with out an upright collar, that was worn over the shoulders and pinned in the corners as a modesty covering.

I have only seen these in tudor portraits and I'm curious if there is any evidence for them being warn later on.


There was a young woman from Wantage, to whom the town clerk took advantage,Said the Borough surveyor "Indeed you must pay 'er, you've totally altered her frontage"

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Re: Tudor bonnets

Postby frances » Thu May 30, 2013 12:23 am

'round woolen ones with a small brim'

Much of our knowledge of the 17th century comes for north European paintings. When I am being a rural strolling minstrel in the 17thc I wear one over a plain linen coif. I copied this directly from a female pipe and player in a Dutch painting. How common this was I do not know. Better wait until someone who has done more 17thc research pops up here.



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Re: Tudor bonnets

Postby Dathi » Mon Jun 03, 2013 12:33 pm

Using Dutch art as a source, although tempting, does bear the risk that's it's not showing English fashions. Which are different as the group known as the Pilgrim Fathers whinged about during their short stay in the Low Countries.

http://the1642goodwyfe.wordpress.com/ is a better source of English woodcuts. Sadly not as good as paintings but there is little or no genre of art similar to the Dutch paintings



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Lady Willow
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Re: Tudor bonnets

Postby Lady Willow » Mon Aug 19, 2013 7:14 pm

The 'Statute Cap' was declared de rigeur in 1597, so it was most likely still around by the mid-1600's. So, not just a 'knotism'! :angel:


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Re: Tudor bonnets

Postby sally » Wed Aug 21, 2013 10:38 am

I haven't been able to find any good evidence for them surviving as far as the Civil War. Agreed that the are still around at the turn of the century, but whilst some styles of hat have a very long life once they appear (thinking things like the Monmouth Labourer's Cap shape), the 'Tudor flat cap' does appear to quietly vanish in the early 17thC as best as I can currently tell. As always, I'd be delighted to be proven wrong, but currently, I can't find any UK primary sources to suggest they were still in common use towards the mid century.



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Re: Tudor bonnets

Postby Merlon. » Wed Aug 21, 2013 1:05 pm

Lady Willow wrote:The 'Statute Cap' was declared de rigeur in 1597, so it was most likely still around by the mid-1600's. So, not just a 'knotism'! :angel:

Err No,
The Statute Cap legislation was repealed in 1597 because it was unenforceable and had not been obeyed for some years. Definitely not “de rigeur”
Bearing that in mind it is extremely unlikely they were still around in the mid century



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Angie
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Re: Tudor bonnets

Postby Angie » Wed Aug 21, 2013 9:11 pm

There was a lengthy exchange of ideas on a sealed knot forum. People came up with a few images but mainly continental or earlier. The consencus of opinion was that there may have been a few around from people who have travelled but not in the numbes I was seeing at the event. Thank you for the imput. It will never stop them being worn I was only curious.


There was a young woman from Wantage, to whom the town clerk took advantage,Said the Borough surveyor "Indeed you must pay 'er, you've totally altered her frontage"


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