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Wind Instruments

Posted: Fri Jul 29, 2005 4:44 pm
by Lady Morgan
Okay, as we have a specialised section I'm hoping that those in the know will see this and might be able to help me.

I play Scottish Highland Warpipes (please don't hold my 'weapon of mass destruction' against me) and when I first started re-enacting I was told the practice chanter for the pipes is similar to a medieval instrument. Hearing this I started on a quest to find music for said instrument, and I'm having no luck.

As my musical skills do not stretch to being able to make my own arrangements of pieces I can't look at something and adjust it for the number of holes on a practice chanter (for those who don't know it goes from A to A, and has eight holes).

Is there anybody out there who could give me advise, or tell me where I could get some help.

Posted: Fri Jul 29, 2005 11:56 pm
by Wayland2002
The bagpipe chanter sounds similar to a bombarde or shawm but these have 7 holes not 8. My bombarde is in B flat, so I can play easy clarinet pieces on it .
Try contacting Helen Chambers at Busy Mole Harps she might be able to help you out

Posted: Tue Aug 02, 2005 12:36 pm
by Lady Morgan
Thanks for that, I'll do some more looking again.

At the moment I am just using tunes that I know that mostly aren't easily recognisable as Scottish pipe tunes (so no 'Scotland the Brave'), but they still sound like pipe tunes to me!!!

Posted: Fri Aug 12, 2005 7:34 pm
by Panzerman
Something I've always wondered and someone on here will probably help me out (No not the door -)

Is a harmonica classed as a wind instrument?

Posted: Sat Aug 13, 2005 7:12 am
by Jenn R
You are getting confused!

Wind instruments are part of an orchestra. The woodwind section is flute, oboe, clarinet, and bassoon.

I don't think there has been any orchestral music written for the harmonica. Well I hope not!

Posted: Sat Aug 20, 2005 11:59 pm
by Cream-T
Sorry to disappoint you, Jenn:

The harmonica is indeed a wind instrument. The classification goes like this:
-> Aerophones (Wind Instruments)
- -> Free Aerophones (pitch not determined by pipe length)
- - -> Free-Reed Instruments (reeds vibrate freely without striking anything)
- - - -> Framed Reed
- - - - -> Mouth Blown
- - - - - -> e.g. Harmonica

See http://www.ksanti.net/free-reed/descrip ... onomy.html for details to the classification of this and other instruments.

Orchestral music for the harmonica does exist - see e.g.
http://www.ksanti.net/free-reed/reviews/littera.html
http://home.netvigator.com/~cblau/khq/newworks.html
http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q= ... a+concerto

Posted: Sun Aug 21, 2005 12:32 am
by Jenn R
I stand corrected!! Thanks for that, I never realised there was orchestral music for the harmonica!

You learn something every day! Cheers mate! :D

You going to be at Cossie?

Posted: Sun Aug 21, 2005 5:15 pm
by Cream-T
Nope, I'm taking this season mostly off, since I had a shoulder operation in June and still can't use my arm fully. (I.e. no archery, no lifiting, no putting up tent...)

Posted: Sun Aug 21, 2005 6:41 pm
by Shadowcat
I have vague memories of someone (Gershwin?) writing a classical piece for Larry Adler, many years ago. Can someone correct me if I'm wrong? I also seem to remember him playing a classical concert with Andre Previn - again many years ago?

Posted: Tue Aug 23, 2005 9:41 pm
by frances
Yes, I also remember that Larry Adler thing. Very good it was too. But then I have just spent the weekend at a music and dance festival that turned out to be all disco dancing and the music ?? .........[/color]

Posted: Tue Sep 13, 2005 2:20 pm
by Sue Green
Would that be "Summertime"? I think that was done on the harmonica

Posted: Tue Sep 13, 2005 3:47 pm
by Shadowcat
No, it was something written specially for Larry Adler - "Summertime" was a solo soprano lullaby from "Porgy and Bess" originally.

Odd classical pieces

Posted: Sun Oct 16, 2005 7:43 am
by craig1459
The museum of musical instruments in Vienna is a must-see for anyone who goes there. The fine selection of instruments from all periods is supported by an excellent audio tour which includes sample pieces where appropriate.

I don't recall if there was any harmonica, but the most surreal was a concerto for Jew's Harp

Re: Odd classical pieces

Posted: Tue Oct 18, 2005 1:01 pm
by histrenact
craig1459 wrote:I don't recall if there was any harmonica, but the most surreal was a concerto for Jew's Harp
Didn't Entwhistle (sp?) or someone similar about ten years ago do a concerto for 27 electric guitars and a bath tub?

David D.

Posted: Tue Oct 18, 2005 2:56 pm
by Steve Stocker
Would you class Jorge as a wind instrument then?
:)

Posted: Thu Feb 02, 2006 3:20 pm
by strumpet
I would like to learn the bagpipes as I have aquired some and was wondering if a practice chanter is the best way to start?

Posted: Fri Feb 03, 2006 8:59 pm
by Wayland2002
Steve Stocker wrote:Would you class Jorge as a wind instrument then?
:)
Sir Fletcher may be a string player but he is definately a wind instrument!!!!!!

Posted: Fri Feb 03, 2006 9:12 pm
by craig1459
Wayland2002 wrote:
Steve Stocker wrote:Would you class Jorge as a wind instrument then?
:)
Sir Fletcher may be a string player but he is definately a wind instrument!!!!!!
More of a weapon than an instrument :lol:

Posted: Sat Feb 04, 2006 12:50 am
by Wayland2002
Yes, his early morning alarm call is legendry

Posted: Sat Feb 04, 2006 11:53 am
by strumpet
I've been scarred for life because of exposure to Jorge from such a young age!!!

Posted: Fri Feb 10, 2006 12:55 pm
by temporary guy
I have just caught this post, how dare you Jo, I resemble that remark.

Nice to see some fellow practitioners of the ancient anal art form.

parp

Posted: Fri Feb 10, 2006 3:10 pm
by Cranky
Strumpet - you could do a lot worse than starting with a copy of 'Play the Bagpipes' by Bernard Boulanger

The book is most thorough, taking you from the first puff, up to complex ornamentation in easy stages.
A cd of musical examples is included.

Details of how to obtain a copy can be found at http://www.bagpipesociety.org.uk/shop.htm

It does depend a bit on what sort of pipes you have acquired - but the bagpipe society should be able to advise.

Posted: Sun Feb 12, 2006 8:50 pm
by Sir Fletcher Phelps
Wayland2002 wrote:Yes, his early morning alarm call is legendry
It's no legend, but a recorded fact! :lol:

Posted: Sun Feb 12, 2006 8:58 pm
by Sir Jarvis Phelps
As recorded in the fifteenth century Croydon Chronicle by Sir Robert Phelps

Posted: Mon Feb 13, 2006 12:16 am
by Wayland2002
Several popes have tried to ban the use of "The wind of Fletcher" against christians.

Posted: Fri Oct 27, 2006 12:32 pm
by Lady Morgan
strumpet wrote:I would like to learn the bagpipes as I have aquired some and was wondering if a practice chanter is the best way to start?
Only just saw this. The answer is simple, the practice chanter is the only way to start. It's also the only way to learn your tunes!!!

I know this is a long time coming (February to October, a very long time), but are you going to be at NLHF this weekend? I'll bring along one of my practice chanters if you want. Of course you may be way ahead now!!!!

I'm sending you a PM if you do want to meet up.