I may have asked this before...

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Foxe
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I may have asked this before...

Postby Foxe » Mon Sep 06, 2010 3:50 pm

... but if I did then I've lost/forgotten the answer.

Does anyone know of a song, which was around in the 1720s, containing the line "Did you not promise that you would marry me?", or something akin to it?


...and further this Informant saith not.

Foxe

'Don't be fooled by his general air of living in a skip'

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Eric the well read
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Re: I may have asked this before...

Postby Eric the well read » Mon Sep 06, 2010 4:07 pm

Hi Foxe,
That line is so reminiscent of a lot if songs! .... but you could try here:-http://www.americanrevolution.org/songs.html
or put an enquiry up here:- http://www.mudcat.org/
Good luck and let us know how you get on!

Regards
Eric



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Re: I may have asked this before...

Postby Heroes of Princeton » Tue Sep 21, 2010 12:23 pm

It could be this, but then again it could not but it's worth a mention either way...

O soldier, soldier, won't you marry me
With your musket fife and drum?
O no sweet maid I cannot marry you
For I have no coat to put on.
So up she went to her grandfather's chest
And she got him a coat of the very, very best
And the soldier put it on.

2. O soldier, soldier, won't you marry me
With your musket fife and drum?
O no sweet maid I cannot marry you
For I have no hat to put on.
So up she went to her grandfather's chest
And she got him a hat of the very, very best
And the soldier put it on.
3. O soldier, soldier, won't you marry me
With your musket fife and drum?
O no sweet maid I cannot marry you
For I have no gloves to put on.
So up she went to her grandfather's chest
And she got him a pair of the very, very best
And the soldier put them on.

4. O soldier, soldier, won't you marry me
With your musket fife and drum?
O no sweet maid I cannot marry you
For I have no boots to put on.
So up she went to her grandfather's chest
And she got him a pair of the very, very best
And the soldier put them on.

O soldier, soldier, won't you marry me
With your musket fife and drum?
O no sweet maid I cannot marry you
For I have for I have a wife of my own.


'If Walsh sought anonymity, he'd found it... laid to rest in an unmarked grave on the high banks of the River Tweed...'

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Grymm
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Re: I may have asked this before...

Postby Grymm » Tue Sep 21, 2010 9:24 pm

The Lily-White Hand and other variants http://www.mustrad.org.uk/articles/dung19.htm

As Johnny walk-ed out one mid-summer's morn
Down by the river side,
'Twas there he spied a pretty fair maid
Who was pleasing to his mind.

"Good morning to you, my pretty fair maid,
Come sing your lover's song.
For I should like to marry you."
"Kind sir, I am too young."

"The younger you are, the better for me,
That in some future day,
I may think within myself,
That I married my wife a babe."

He took her by the lily-white hand,
He kissed both cheeks and chin,
He took her to a very large house
For to spend the night within.

The night being past, the morning came,
The sun shone bright and clear.
The young man arose, put on his clothes,
Saying, "Fare-ye-well my dear."

"But that's not the promise you gave to me,
Down by the river side.
You promised that you would marry me,
Make me your lawful bride."

"If that is the promise I gave to you,
It's more than I can do.
To think of marrying a poor girl like you,
So easily led astray."

"So you may go home to your mother's house,
And there you may cry your fill.
And think what you have brought on yourself
All by your own good will."

"I will not go home to my mother's house
To take any grief or distress;
But I will go and drown myself,
All in some lonesome place."

He took her by the lily-white hand,
He kissed both cheeks and chin.
He took her to the riverside
And he gently pushed her in.


Futuaris nisi irrisus ridebis.


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