Is Asia good or Bad for Reenactment

Making, Pictures, Queries, Resources

Moderator: Moderators

User avatar
Cream-T
Posts: 25
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2005 11:37 pm
Location: Dartmoor - at Her Majesty's pleasure
Contact:

Post by Cream-T »

Many thanks for your reassurance! This makes me definitely feel better about your goods and I'll have a look at your website for my next shopping spree... :)
http://www.milwr.org - extremitatem acutam ad hostibus!

Stephen brown
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 1:37 pm
Location: Co Durham
Contact:

Post by Stephen brown »

Thanks Cream-T
We are a very open company and are here for the long haul, and to be anythig else would be foolish.
See some price reductions in the maille and bucklers as a thank you to all who have supported us over the last and previous year.

SB
GDFB

User avatar
Richard Meriton
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed Oct 05, 2005 10:33 pm
Location: North wales

Post by Richard Meriton »

I to can testifiy that the factory in india is not a sweat shop as I have been there myself. And on another point I'd like to say that I would happily wear a GDFB helmet in a tourney.

User avatar
zauberdachs
Post Centurion
Posts: 695
Joined: Tue Oct 25, 2005 7:38 pm

Post by zauberdachs »

I have a GDFB helmet, I'd rate it 10/10.

India has a much greater base of craftsmen than this country, we could learn a great deal from them.

I am a little dubious about the carbon footprint of shipping something than ca be made locally across the entire globe just to save me some £££.
Do not be loath, diligent reader, to winnow my chaff, and lay up the wheat in the storehouse of your memory. For truth regards not who is the speaker, nor in what manner it is spoken, but that the thing be true - Nennius, 8th century

User avatar
RTB
Posts: 81
Joined: Tue Aug 23, 2005 5:10 pm
Location: Wigan

Post by RTB »

zauberdachs wrote:
I am a little dubious about the carbon footprint of shipping something than ca be made locally across the entire globe just to save me some £££.
I am no expert at this, however I have heard that it is cheaper to move a shipload of coal from Australia to Liverpool, than it is to move it from Liverpool to Warrington in wagons to burn in the power station.


I would imagine the items are moved by shipped container rather than by air, leaving a much smaller (per tonne moved) carbon footprint.

Chris
Winner: Livinghistory.co.uk "Posting Style of the Year" Award, 1978

User avatar
zauberdachs
Post Centurion
Posts: 695
Joined: Tue Oct 25, 2005 7:38 pm

Post by zauberdachs »

Yes I believe shipping is much the most carbon efficient transport however bear i mind that an item shipped travels like this:
1. 5000km by sea
2. From the port to the business by lorry
3. From the business to the customer by lorry.

Whereas the local made product goes:
1. From the forge/workshop to the busniess by lorry
2. From the business to the customer by lorry.

The difference being minus the 5000km+ sea journey. So despite sea transport being cheaper buying locally is still less carbon pollution :)
Do not be loath, diligent reader, to winnow my chaff, and lay up the wheat in the storehouse of your memory. For truth regards not who is the speaker, nor in what manner it is spoken, but that the thing be true - Nennius, 8th century

Scraggles

Post by Scraggles »

bit on tv recently with some company who was supposed to recyle green bin waste finding it cheaper to export to india or indonesia, presumably to be recylcyed in a whole in the ground ?

like the gdfb kit, very well made. not over impressed on the boots, but guess things will improve :)

I do buy kit locally, last bit or armor bought it this year and was well made, think it was by some welsh guy whose name I forget

Post Reply