Tudor gown lacing?

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Tudor gown lacing?

Postby lidimy » Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:34 pm

hey,
am starting work on the bodice of my early tudor (circa 1530) gown and i need to know where to put the lacing... i know that their are 2 theories on the matter, concerning pinning which features on an image of jane seymour - but i would like to know your opinions on the matter before i start hacking chunks of satin!!
lidimy


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Postby Sophia » Tue Sep 26, 2006 11:04 pm

Lidimy,

If you want a quick source of information on fastenings then check out this link:

http://www.elizabethancostume.net/

Most lacings as far as I know are of the spiral type, i.e. offset. and are general at the front unless you very high class. If you are wearing pair of bodies under you kirtle you could use hooks and eyes to fasten your kirtle.

The pins visible in the Holbein picture are probably holding a front flap or separate panel in place that is hiding a front lacing.

If your pocket money stretches I would buy the Tudor Tailor sooner rather than later as it explains everything in more detail and is only £19.99 - not much more than a couple of albums on CD and much more useful.

Remember - before you cut your satin you should make up at least one full mock up of the bodice in a cheap fabric of similar weight. Good fabric shops often have cheap cotton calico for as little as £2 or £3 per metre in 150cm wide. This is excellent as it has a a square weave. If you cut some and wash it you can also use it to interline your bodice which is an absolute must - for this sort of bodice you really need calico and canvas (preferably linen) as you will need to bone it unless you have made a pair of bodies to go underneath (again something probably restricted to the very upper crust of society at the time of the Holbein portraits)..

All the best,

Sophia :D



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Postby lidimy » Wed Sep 27, 2006 4:19 pm

thankoo :)

ok, i am not by any means new to that site :D it is very helpful!! can you define 'very high class' for me though? :S
wasnt too sure about the pair of bodies thing - i have boned my kirtle though, will that be ok? it laces up the back though too.
was looking for lining anyway for my gown, thanks for the rather essential hint to do a test run first.... there was me going straight into it..
:oops:
will get some material then. what colour do you suggest to line it with? would a cream colour be ok? and also, interlining... is that where you have the satin, then the lining, with an extra layer between the two? because i got some stiffening material when i first got my satin, which i have double thickness for my bodice. will that be ok?
so you suggest front lacing..... with a panel at the front to pin over the top. would this panel be removable? (pinned on both sides? or pinned on one side and sewn on the other?)


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Postby Sophia » Wed Sep 27, 2006 4:55 pm

By high class I mean gentry - if you are using satin this is you :D

If your kirtle is boned you shouldn't need to bone your gown (could you manage to post some picture of your kirtle?). Personally I would always favour front lacing as this is much easier to get into by yourself. :D

Your lining colour is a matter of choice - is your gown going to have a split skirt at the front. If so you might want to consider a contrasting colour. The best fabric for lining is linen (though remember to pre-wash it and ensure that you have over bought by about 1/2 metre at least to allow for shrinkage. If your lining is not going to show then just use off-white, this is my favoured colour for kirtles and other ordinary garments and I tend to buy it is 10m lengths and keep it in stock. :D

When it comes to internlining I prefer to use calico rather than a modern iron-on interfacing as this gives a more genuine effect. Large expanses of vilene type stuff tends to give a very cardboardy effect as the layers don't move right. :D

You can have your front-lacing showing or cover it with a variety of flaps. These can be sewn on at one side or completely separate. If you are wearing it over a boned kirtle you could consider using hooks and eyes (hidden of course) - at this period these are set alternately hool then eye rather than all on the same side. There are fuller details on the types of options available in the Tudor Tailor which is my main source for this information. :D

Don't worry about wanting to plough ahead - I can think of any number of disasters I had in the dressmaking department when I was your age. Generally due to impatience. My advice is measure three times to cut once and remember you can always take away fabric but it is very difficult to add it. I often end up making two or three toiles before I cut my final fabric if I am doing a completely new style of garment and generally re-toile everytime as my weight fluctuates a lot. You should make yourself a set of eyelet bands or buy pre-made eyelet tape. If you sew these on and lace them up you can really check your fit. :D

Please whatever you do, do not take my recommendations as gospel as Tudor/Elizabethan is not my real speciality area. I have done some research, but not yet made anything up. WOTR stuff needs to be done as this is what I need for events and I also have to clothe my husband (feel like the Eishes Chayil from Proverbs when in full swing :roll: :D )

Sophia :D



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Postby lidimy » Wed Sep 27, 2006 5:20 pm

thankoo again :D

yep, my dress will indeed have a split down the middle, i can see how lacing at the front would make this a lot easier!! do you think that this panel would also be removed and the dress worn without it, as it appears in the picture of thomas more's family?
also, the sleeves are an issue.... i know that the baggy bits off the elbow are called turnbacks, but is this literally a turnback of the sleeve, i.e is it the lining that is visible as the sleeve is 'turned back'?

as for the book, i got a book voucher from my school for winning the year prize for english (woo!) and so that would make it easier to afford!! i will have a snoop around for it :)

i will try and take a piccy of me + kirtle later on :)


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Postby Sophia » Wed Sep 27, 2006 5:43 pm

Lidimy,

A removeable front panel would be more adaptable as you could make a separate one in a different fabric or in the same fabric with embroidery on it. But don't get too overambitious - the joy is that once you have made one outfit it is much easier to make another.

When it comes to sleeves, turnbacks is literal. However, remember that people often pieced and cheated so it is perfectly acceptable to only line the lower section the sleeve with a posh fabric - you can just match/contrast your fabric. See this website:

http://livinghistory.co.uk/homepages/tudorcostumes/welcome.html

Apologies for not having dug it up ealier - cross referenced it from the following link which you may already have:

http://www.myladyswardrobe.com/

The Tudor Tailor is currently being discounted by Amazon.co.uk, so perhaps you can negotiate with your parents. Link as follows:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Tudor-Tailor-Jane-Malcolm-Davies/dp/0713489855/sr=8-1/qid=1159375295/ref=sr_1_1/202-8170744-7696645?ie=UTF8&s=books

All the best,

Sophia :D



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Postby Annis » Wed Sep 27, 2006 5:47 pm

Sophia wrote:Lidimy,

A removeable front panel would be more adaptable as you could make a separate one in a different fabric or in the same fabric with embroidery on it.


Isnt that called a stomacher?

Annis x


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Postby Sophia » Wed Sep 27, 2006 5:53 pm

Think you are right there Annis. :D

Problem is being pre-1509 my terminology is slightly different and some bits of clothing didn't exist yet. :roll:

You are probably better placed to advise Lidimy than I am on this stuff as I can only refer to other peoples research not yet having moved beyond 1509 except in theory. Have promised myself that I will do Kentwell one day.

Sophia :D



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Postby Annis » Wed Sep 27, 2006 5:55 pm

Well, im no wizz in gentry stuff, im a peasant me, so its only the real basics that i know.


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Postby Sophia » Wed Sep 27, 2006 5:59 pm

Tamsin - are you out there :?:

Perhaps you can advise here :D

Sophia

P.S. Give me a call sometime :D



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Postby lidimy » Wed Sep 27, 2006 6:32 pm

*is fairly overwhelmed with info*

ok, those links should keep me going for some time methinks! and it answered a few questions too!

thankyou very much :D

what about prehaps lining it all in a half posh-ish fabric, then used it as turnbacks too?

its all so exciting :D

a stomacher... what an idea! i guess i would need one too?


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Tudor Dresses.

Postby myladyswardrobe » Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:13 am

Hi everyone.

Just stumbled across this thread.

Sophia - many thanks for posting my website URL as an example. There is a lot of missing stuff cos I haven't yet updated it but I am quite happy to help you out here.

I'm also at Kentwell and have been making Tudor and Elizabethan gowns for the past 14 years (good grief! Where has the time gone!).

Lidimy,

Have you actually set your gown design as per the "Jane Seymour" gown? Or are you still trying to decide exactly. Assuming you are making the JS gown, this is the minimum that you should be making:
1. Smock.

2. Underkirtle (sounds like you already have this. Back lacing is fine - just make sure you find someone who can lace you into it! Though you *can* do it yourself if you have the lacing done up permanently.)

3. Petticoat or half kirtle. This is essentially a skirt which has your forepart at the front. The back and sides of this skirt can be in a plainer/cheaper fabric whereas the front bit (which is the forepart) is in a finer, more decorative fabric. During the Tudor period, this usually matches the under or foresleeves.

4. Gown - this is the bit you've mentioned which has the lacing section hidden under the placket (or stomacher as Annis said). It also has the turn back sleeves. It *could* be back laced but we do have ONE contemporary illustration of the back of a gown like this and there doesn't seem to be a back lacing to it. Its hidden under the stomacher/placket.

5. Foresleeves/undersleeves - these match your forepart and in the 1530s have a bottom "seam" only which is caught at about three or four points (wrist, elbow and one or two in between). Fine linen is pulled through between the catches (usually fake because no smock will be comfortable and have big enough sleeves to ensure the puffs stay in position all the time).

6. Head dress - in the 1530s, more likely to be the gable but an early style french hood (a la Anne Boleyn style) is also being seen.

Couple of suggestions:
Don't try to make this gown (as a Jane Seymour one) act also as a More Family gown. If you look carefully at the gowns the More Family girls wear, the stomacher is UNDER the lacing and its actually their underkirtle. The overgown which has the wide lacing doesn't have an open front to the skirt.

DO get hold of the Tudor Tailor and I strongly advise spending a bit more money and going direct to the authors. Amazon have NOT been getting the book out to people (mainly due to the fact that the first print run sold out in a very short space of time). Also, if you ask the authors nicely, they may well autograph it for you. And they really are very nice people -I know them both very well.

DO get hold of cheap calico or cotton sheeting and make up the gown in that fabric first (no need to line it - just get the fit and construction right on cheap fabric). Remnants section can sometimes give you just enough fabric for this purpose and can be really nice and cheap.

If you want any further help or advice, feel free to contact me direct - I don't always get to read this site now so wouldn't necessarily see your replies, but will get emails on my private email address: myladysw AT myladyswardrobe DOT com

Happy Sewing!


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Postby Sophia » Thu Sep 28, 2006 10:07 am

Bess,

Thank you so much for that - I was desperately hoping that a serious Kentwellie would spot this thread (I was thinking of Tamsin who I know does Gentry). :D

As I have said this is really not my area of expertise and though I have been dressmaking for years and I have only been doing period clothes for about 3 years and am concentrating on 1450-1509.

Many Thanks,

Sophia :D



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Postby myladyswardrobe » Thu Sep 28, 2006 10:51 am

Hi Sophia,

You're very welcome. Glad I can be of help. If you ever want any advice/help on Tudor/Elizabethan, feel free to contact me.

I know Tam very well as we both started in Kentwell in the gentry the same year (1993/1593!).

I've been costuming for the 16th century period ever since then and I love it. I have recently started to move into other costuming areas such as Victorian and Jane Austen period (Tam has a dress and spencer jacket for that period from me) but I am really getting interested in decorative needlearts now - especially needlelace!!
I have a project in mind for a completely hand sewn Elizabethan low necked smock with reticella squares in the sleeves! The seams I hope to be all Italian hemstitched and then insertion stitched together. The neckline MAY also be whiteworked but will probably have a simple punto in aria lace edging instead.


I once made one medieval gown which I used in Cosmeston in South Wales. Sadly, since my family moved from South Wales to Suffolk, I have absolutely no idea where that gown has gone. Which is a real shame 'cos it was a nice one. It was a nice sturdy but brown wool all in one and very fitted gown, laced at the back (which it probably shouldn't have been!) but was VERY comfy! Would have been so nice with a sideless kirtle over the top but I never got round to making that.

Anyway, better get back to work I suppose!

Take care

Bess.


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Postby lidimy » Thu Sep 28, 2006 4:15 pm

Lidimy,

Have you actually set your gown design as per the "Jane Seymour" gown? Or are you still trying to decide exactly. Assuming you are making the JS gown, this is the minimum that you should be making:
1. Smock.

2. Underkirtle (sounds like you already have this. Back lacing is fine - just make sure you find someone who can lace you into it! Though you *can* do it yourself if you have the lacing done up permanently.)

3. Petticoat or half kirtle. This is essentially a skirt which has your forepart at the front. The back and sides of this skirt can be in a plainer/cheaper fabric whereas the front bit (which is the forepart) is in a finer, more decorative fabric. During the Tudor period, this usually matches the under or foresleeves.

4. Gown - this is the bit you've mentioned which has the lacing section hidden under the placket (or stomacher as Annis said). It also has the turn back sleeves. It *could* be back laced but we do have ONE contemporary illustration of the back of a gown like this and there doesn't seem to be a back lacing to it. Its hidden under the stomacher/placket.

5. Foresleeves/undersleeves - these match your forepart and in the 1530s have a bottom "seam" only which is caught at about three or four points (wrist, elbow and one or two in between). Fine linen is pulled through between the catches (usually fake because no smock will be comfortable and have big enough sleeves to ensure the puffs stay in position all the time).

6. Head dress - in the 1530s, more likely to be the gable but an early style french hood (a la Anne Boleyn style) is also being seen.


ok, out of all the things you have mentioned, i have just numbers 3 and 2. and they are both finished, aswell as my french hood. thanks for the hint about the sleeves, i was wondering how i was going to get the material to pull through the gaps!!
i will start on my bodice practice design soon, i still have enough material left from the sheet i used to make my kirtle :D
i am going for the JS look, i was going to make it more like the style shown in the dress that the young elizabeth wears, but i was a bit daunted by the pointy waist bit at the front!!

as for going to the authors... meh, i have an inert fear of going to people like that and just randomly asking them if they can help me!! silly i know, but a problem nonetheless. but i will most definitely try to get this book.

i immensely enjoyed reading your site :D thankyou for taking the time to produce such an informative source!!


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Postby Sophia » Thu Sep 28, 2006 4:45 pm

Lidimy,

Ninya and Jane are really nice and very happy to talk to anyone who is interested in Tudor Clothing whether they are just starting out or seriously experienced.

I ordered my book from them via their website in advance of publication because I find Tudor Clothing much more daunting than the Medieval stuff and not being a stock size or shape it is difficult for me to buy patterns. I picked it up at the Spring Market and they only too delighted to dedicate if for me. Their website is here:

http://www.tudortailor.com/index.htm

Nobody is going to bite your head off so go on be bold - there is a time to ask :D (pace Kohelet)


Sophia



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Postby lidimy » Thu Sep 28, 2006 7:00 pm

ok, i am now looking through the site - they have a patterns page (wooo!!)
looks very informative and helpful :D


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Postby Shadowcat » Thu Sep 28, 2006 7:59 pm

They are both lovely people, and always, so it seems, ready to help with advice. Ninya is slightly busy right now with the new baby, but I am sure will be able to help if you need it.

Or you can ask questions on here if you need to - there are lots of us who make Tudor. You could also see if you can find "Period Costumes for Stage and Screen 1500 - 1800" by Jean Hunnisett, in your local library, or get them to borrow it from another library for you. It has clear drawings of the type of bodice you are thinking of, all very helpful. Don't be put off by the title - all the costumes are thoroughly researched. However, she uses modern tecniques to put the garments together, so you will want other advice for that if you want to go the "authentic" way.

S.



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Postby lidimy » Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:08 pm

sounds great, i am actually obliged to do everything by hand anyway as i have no sewing machine! the experiences that i have had with them has been pretty bad, so while i did try using one round a friends house, the results were pretty disastrous! and, since i have made my kirtle and forepart/petticoats by hand, i feel a lot more proud of myself :)
though having said that, i showed the said friend some elementary blackwork of mine which goes round the hem of my white satin petticoat and she thought that i had used a sewing machine for it :evil: wasnt sure if it was a compliment or not!


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Postby myladyswardrobe » Thu Sep 28, 2006 10:24 pm

Hi Lidimy,

I'm so pleased my website has been a useful source to you. I'm hoping to get it updated sometime this winter but I have my sister's reproduction Tudor and Medieval Jewellery Website to setup first.

Usually, its advisable to make the smock first but it doesn't really matter as long as you have *something* (such as a T-shirt) that can be used beneath the outer layers when fitting.

I applaud you for handsewing everything. You should be proud of yourself. I used to handsew entire costumes again because I hated machines (had a number of arguments with them in school! :? ) and when I was at University I didn't have access to one anyway.

Your friend probably meant her comment about your blackwork looking machine done as a compliment. If she isn't comfortable with hand sewing, her "benchmark" of sewing may well be good machine sewing. So do take it as a compliment. :D

Due to time constraints (I work in London but live in Suffolk), I have to machine sew parts of the gown such as skirt seams and the hem - handsewing a 3 yard seam bores me to tears!!!! :wink: However, anything that is "seen" is hand finished or handsewn. And any embroidery is all hand done. At present I am working on a drawnthreadwork partlet!

There is a useful technique for handsewing which will make the task of sewing the bodice a little easier than it would otherwise be. If you would like me to explain it then contact me privately and I can email the explanation. Its also a period technique!

Please don't be worried about talking direct to Ninya or Jane. Ninya is SO generous with her advice and help - I have learned such a lot about period costuming from her. She kindly gave up an afternoon of her time to help me with my wedding gown (which you can see on my website). I had a problem with getting the skirt to sit correctly at the front and she said to come down to her studio which was then in Godalming so she could help get it right.

The Tudor Tailor patterns are excellent and SO easy to use. I pattern tested the corsets and the smock/shirts for Ninya when the book was being proof read and checked over (you can see my name in the acknowlegements when you get it!). If you want to get a kirtle pattern, the I would heartily recommend it. It will certainly help you out and you can then adapt it to the JS gown itself easily.

Anyway, I'm probably overloading you with costuming suggestions etc, so I will finish now.

One question: Are you making this just because you want to or for a particular reason?

Take care and best wishes,


Gentry/Tailor/Needlelace Maker - Kentwell.

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Postby Tuppence » Fri Sep 29, 2006 1:08 am

I remember the days of hand stitching everything, cos the machine I had was ancient and only did straight stitch (and that not well!).

Now when I have time I hand stitch all my own kit (and Nige's), cos I like hand stitching and can do it front of the telly.

I've also had the assumptions of mnachining thing - from a mop at a show who'd just watched me hand stitch a seam. Apparently it was pre-machined to give me a guide :shock: .


Just a couple of points on your outfit (good choice btw - I've wanted to do something like that for ages, but never find the time - too busy making stuff for other people :? ).

On the opening of the dress, I've never been able to decide completely whether that particular painting shows a bodice that has a lacing section underneath that's attached to the outer fabric, or whether the pinning is a fastening.

I think I probably lean more towards the first, as a pinned fastening along doesn't seem logical.

But the position of the lacing wouldn't really affect the front split that much, as there's a waistseam, and a slash to allow you to put it on would be hidden in the folds of the skirt anyway.

On the kirtle, boning wasn't really used that early - bodices and similar should really be stiffened rather than boned.
(I know it's too late for the one you've made now, and don't want to discourage you at all. (Besides, it would have to be someone particularly anal who'd prevent you from wearing it after all that hard work :lol: , and it won't be seen anyway, and will give a similar shape), but worth bearing in mind for future projects.

On the bodice lacing - you will need to put some sort of stiffening at the edges, even if only a heavy linen. If the fit over the kirtle is properly tight, then it will wrinkle at the lacing points, even if the kirtle is boned, It's the stress on the lacing holes that causes it.

When making up a toile (i.e. mock up) out of cotton or cheap fabric, remember to stiffen it in the same places you'll be stiffening the finished product (or use heavier fabric in those places). That way you'll get a much truer picture than if you use a softer fabric alone.

If you're handtitching any seams that will take any strain, use a backstitch (which is stronger than machining anyway when done properly) - but I bet you knew that!

The stomacher should sit behind (i.e. under) the lacing of the the bottom stiffened lacing. For you that would be the kirtle (right??). It basically serves the purpose of holding in all the bits that would bulge out the gap with out it. :oops: :lol: If the lacing on the bodice isn't visible, as in the jane s dress, you shouldn't need another stomacher. (They're only used in bodices when the lacing is visible, so that you don't see the corsetry (underwear!!!) behind it - a decency thing rather than a practical one.)

The 'lining' of the sleeves at the turnbacks quite often was only applied just above the turnback (more likely with something bulky like fur, but possibly with something expensive too).

Back lacing yourself into corsetry and bodices can be done, and is quite easy when you get the hang of it - though it's harder with early straight / spiral lacing than with later criss cross, and you'll need a longer lace (it has to be threaded before you put it over your head).

DON'T use fusible interfacing. horrible stuff - it doesn't move remotely like proper interlining, and it has a tendency to come unstuck in places after a while, causing a nasty bubble effect.

I wouldn't use a cotton either, because it too doesn't move enough like a good linen canvas (or even a heavyish weight linen). If cost is factor it's an ok substitute for linen or flax, but I wouldn't waste all that effort on half measures. (Besides, in my group, using calico would be seen as copping out, and I'd never live it down (but we are quite strict - no visible maching (incl machined hems etc))!!)

Definitely alternate the hooks and eyes if using - it's less a period thing than an it works thing (if they're all on one side they tend to pop open when you move). Hooks and eyes best from annie t pedlar, naturally - she does all mine, and I get through loads.

Debbie


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Postby myladyswardrobe » Fri Sep 29, 2006 12:21 pm

Hi Tuppence,

I've also had the assumptions of mnachining thing - from a mop at a show who'd just watched me hand stitch a seam. Apparently it was pre-machined to give me a guide


::giggle:: I've had that said to me before now! I've also had the comment from dear, dotty old lady to her friend (another dear, dotty old lady), "oooh, look - you don't see ladies hand sewing nowadays". That one ALWAYS makes me smile!

On the opening of the [JS] dress, I've never been able to decide completely whether that particular painting shows a bodice that has a lacing section underneath that's attached to the outer fabric, or whether the pinning is a fastening.


Now, its funny you should say that because its something that I have thought for a while. Mainly because I have NEVER managed to get pins to sit so beautifully and neatly and in perfect order as they do on JS - and I've put them in place on someone else's costume as well as my own. Neither would work (unless the pins were shoved directly into the poor person!). And it isn't as if JS is the only portrait to have this kind of "fastening".

The Mistress Pemberton portrait has the same fastening except on the right hand side (which then begs the question - could this kind of fastening have been done on BOTH sides of the placket).

I have wondered if the little gold beads are a sort of rivet but how they would then attach to the bodice underneath is not clear.

I suppose it will always be a bit of a mystery - just like that white shoulder band on some of the 1520s/30s portraits!

Ninya made me a dress of this sort of style (more a cross between the JS and the Mary Rose Tudor, Dowager Queen of France/Duchess of Suffolk portrait. She has a lacing panel underneath, the right side of it is mostly stitched to the front placket along the waist and neckline where as the left hand side of the lacing is "free-er". There is the complication that this gown, following the Mary gown, doesn't have a front open split in the skirt, but once its all done up the placket hooks up easily on the left hand side right underneath the arm.

If I was doing the JS gown, thats the way I would do it, with the added help that the split skirt is stitched to the bottom edge of the lacing panels. I'd make the top placket waist line just a smidging longer than the lacing panels.

I wonder if the (referring to my previous comment) there are "hooks" which are rivetted to through the placket edge so we only see the rivet but not the hook? Not entirely sure how it would work but it could be a possibility (pity Her Grace can't step down from her portrait and show us - wonder if she is at the Tate Britain - Holbein exhibition????).

Regards


Gentry/Tailor/Needlelace Maker - Kentwell.

www.myladyswardrobe.com

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Postby Shadowcat » Fri Sep 29, 2006 12:33 pm

Hooks work pretty well for the fastening, although these ones cannot be used alternately. I made this kind of dress for "Anne Boleyn", but you can't really see the beads pretending to be pin heads on the left side of the bodice!

Can't seem to post the image - here is the url.
http://i7.photobucket.com/albums/y260/S ... Boleyn.jpg

(Bess made the coif - it's lovely.)
S
Last edited by Shadowcat on Fri Sep 29, 2006 12:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.



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Postby Sophia » Fri Sep 29, 2006 12:35 pm

Bess,

In answer to your question about the JS Holbein portrait, yes she is at Tate Britain. I think the catalogue for this exhibition is going to be an absolute must for Tudor Costume buffs as it seems to include lots of his chalk and pastel drawings.

Fancy a trip?

Sophia :D



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Postby Shadowcat » Fri Sep 29, 2006 12:36 pm

Sorry Sophia - she's booked with my group - unless she wants to go twice - or three times, or...................


S.



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Postby Sophia » Fri Sep 29, 2006 12:46 pm

Suzi,

When is your group going and are there still places - I would love to go with a serious group.

Sophia :D



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Postby Shadowcat » Fri Sep 29, 2006 12:47 pm

I'll pm you - it's a personal group.

S.



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Postby Sophia » Fri Sep 29, 2006 12:56 pm

Thanks Suzi.

Sophia :D



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Postby myladyswardrobe » Fri Sep 29, 2006 1:14 pm

Oooohhhh!!! I'm being fought over to go to the Holbein Exhibition!!!

Sophia - You will definitely like our group!! Its great - isn't it Suzi?? I especially like our dear leader!! :lol:

Yes - I definitely would like to go to the Holbein Exhibition. I've seen the Ambassador's portrait at the National Portrait Gallery after it had been cleaned up - they had a special (but small) exhibition of Holbein and 16th century portraits with that one being the centrepiece. I remember my Dad coming up to London to meet up with me so we could go and see it.

It would be great to see the JS there - thats usually in Austria!!!!

Now, wouldn't it be nice to do go in cossie??? (Though I don't think my SO will want to do that and London is not really an easy place to go in cossie though!!!).

Squeeeeee!!!!

::bounce::bounce::


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Postby Sophia » Fri Sep 29, 2006 1:23 pm

I have been in touch with Suzi and it sounds like a great idea. Wonderful opportunity to swap ideas with more experienced people than me.

Would cheerfully go in costume (have wondered around London in stranger things in my youth :shock: ). Only problem is that I am a little early for Holbein as I do late WOTR, i.e. the transition to early Tudor. Also I am sure that my clothes are not up to the same standard as yours.

Look forward to meeting you all.

Sophia :lol:




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