Embroidery

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lillicat23
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Embroidery

Post by lillicat23 »

I'm making some kit for 1066-1150 period and I'd like to decorate my dresses a little. When I was involved in Viking Re-enactment there was a lot of celtic knotwork embroidered on clothes, but I'm not familiar with anything from a later period. A lot of the pictures I've looked at don't show embroidery and there's just basic lacing - would it be considered an anachronism to embroider kirtles?

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Colin Middleton
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Re: Embroidery

Post by Colin Middleton »

You wouldn't be wearing a kirtle before the 14th C. I assume that you mean a cote.

I think that they were decorated at the wrists and necks, but I'm not sure if it was embroidery or sewn-on braid.
Colin

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Lena
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Re: Embroidery

Post by Lena »

Hi Lillicat,

Illustrations in 12th century manuscripts indicate that some form of decoration was going on. I'm not sure whether any embroidery during that time was sewn straight to the clothes, or embroidered on a band that was sewn to the clothes. Regardless, avoid Celtic knotwork.

I would recommend you to to to the yahoo group 12th century garb (http://groups.yahoo.com/group/12thCenturyGarb) and ask. They are usually very knowledgeable.

Best of luck,
Lena

lillicat23
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Re: Embroidery

Post by lillicat23 »

Thankyou :)

SaraSF
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Re: Embroidery

Post by SaraSF »

I've got my nose in this book: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Embroiderers-Me ... 0714120510 at the moment, and I've learned so much about medieval embroidery already. It may be like teaching some of the more experienced crafters/LH-ers to suck eggs, but since I'm relatively new to 1100-1400, I've found it a great place to start. Have a look, I hope you won't be disappointed!

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lucy the tudor
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Re: Embroidery

Post by lucy the tudor »

Thanks for the tip Sara, it looks interesting, have ordered a copy.
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SaraSF
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Re: Embroidery

Post by SaraSF »

Glad to be of use! I've used pinterest to collate some of the images from the book - I've been using it as a study aid for work- thought I'd share

http://pinterest.com/sasaragor/medieval ... beginners/

[edited to add: it's a work in progress - some of these images are really hard to find! - or, some museums make sharing easier than others?]

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Lady Willow
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Re: Embroidery

Post by Lady Willow »

Eeek! Medieval embroidery for beginners ? Yikes, if that's for beginners, I can't imagine the advanced stuff... but still, it is beautiful to look at! :wink: Thanks for the link to your pinterest site.
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tanyabentham
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Re: Embroidery

Post by tanyabentham »

for beginners

a basic tutorial on laid and couched work(bayeux stitch)

http://opusanglicanum.wordpress.com/201 ... ched-work/

uses for stem stitch

http://opusanglicanum.wordpress.com/201 ... em-stitch/

how to do faces in opusanglicanum technique

http://opusanglicanum.wordpress.com/201 ... nglicanum/

and some freehand blackwork for later period stuff

http://opusanglicanum.wordpress.com/201 ... blackwork/

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