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Posted: Mon Feb 13, 2006 11:24 am
by Mary Craig
Depends on the stitch. I'm right handed so running stitch and back stitch are worked right to left. Herringbone, blanket stitch, stem stitch, etc.,is worked left to right.
I was three when they (Gran, mum, aunts) started to teach me to sew....using a tiny silver thimble, I think it's a Victorian one......and a piece of even weave linen. Running stitch, back stitch, stem stitch, blanket stitch, satin stitch, cross, herringbone......and if it wasn't good enough out it came :( I soon learned :) I smocked and embroidered the fronts of two of my muslin summer frocks when I was five (early sixties, pretty things for girls) Very simple, but neat.
Then I went to school and sewing and knitting was half an hour a week, and it was dreadful. Awful gingham and binca. Secondary school was streamed and my class did Latin and three sciences so no domestic/ home economics.

cheers,
Mary

Posted: Mon Feb 13, 2006 12:10 pm
by WorkMonkey
left to right. Left handy.

Posted: Tue Feb 14, 2006 12:19 am
by ada-anne
I'm right handed and sew seams right to left. Herringbone, obviously, progresses left to right when the needle is going right to left. Hemming I'm never sure which way I want it - usually do the first few stitches and then decide I've got it the wrong way up.

My mother taught needlework (although she swears she didn't teach me to sew - it was quicker for her to do it - but I must have picked it up somewhere) and I remember the things her pupils had to do. First was a bag to put their future projects in, and they had to do some very basic machine decoration, to prove they could do curves and corners etc. Then an apron and after that came a simple nightdress. But my mother could never do anything without a pattern. She was quite amazed to see me just measuring and cutting for a t-tunic - and my engineering father had to help with scaling up patterns etc when I said I wanted a sacque out of Patterns of Fashion for my wedding dress!

Posted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:27 am
by Lady Jane
Well, I'm just glad all your bad experiences as school didn't faze you all. Same happened here in Oz, maybe our curriculum was based on UK model? Hand sewn French seams on baby doll pyjamas in Primary School for me in the 60's, then embroidery in early High school. Year 11 and 12 we had Domestic Science or Needlework electives. Still can't cook to save my life, but can throw together elaborate historic costumes and underpinnings. Cooked chooks are cheap to feed the family and there's always the Pizza man. Wish we had more re-enactment groups over here so I could earn some decent money sewing for them. You lot are so lucky.Maybe I can emmigrate? :)

Posted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:36 am
by WorkMonkey
I should have said "hand sew? thats what I have women for"


And that is indeed what I have women for.

Posted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:39 am
by Jenn R
Only because you are too young to be allowed to play with sharp objects!

Posted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 11:41 am
by WorkMonkey
*sighs*

Posted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 2:33 pm
by Alice the Huswyf
I will sew for you baby boy: how's about a sea-shroud with the last stitch through yer nose to check you that ARE dead (and over the side with you anyway!

PS My beard belongs to me.

Posted: Mon Feb 20, 2006 2:33 pm
by Alice the Huswyf
I will sew for you baby boy: how's about a sea-shroud with the last stitch through yer nose to check you that ARE dead (and over the side with you anyway!

PS My beard belongs to me.

Posted: Sat Feb 25, 2006 10:12 pm
by LadyPenelope
Left to right, but I can do either. Ambidextrous, mainly right handed but taught by left hander.

All I can remember about sewing in primary school: teachers screaming at you if you did it 'wrong'. All I remember of secondary school 'needlework' was the teacher was having an affair with one of the woodwork teachers and spent the entire lesson sending us backwards and forwards with love notes (which we duly read). Far more exciting than sewing.

Posted: Sat Feb 25, 2006 10:55 pm
by Eve
I'm right-handed and I taught myself to embroider when I was 8 & dress-making when I started serious re-enactment 10 years ago (I'm now 52). I hand sew left to right, right to left and upwards. Seems to depend on the material, where the top layer of material is, what the stich is & how I fancy doing it that day. Odd, ain't it?

Posted: Sun Feb 26, 2006 12:03 am
by MedicKitten
i would have said "right to left" as i'm a lefty, and then i flat-felled about six yards of white linen yesterday, and discovered that i actually sew in either direction based on what's more convenient and whether i'm willing to turn around a massive pile of fabric. Sometimes i even stitch right-handed around fiddly bits.

Posted: Sun Feb 26, 2006 9:40 am
by WorkMonkey
Alice the Huswyf wrote:I will sew for you baby boy: how's about a sea-shroud with the last stitch through yer nose to check you that ARE dead (and over the side with you anyway!

PS My beard belongs to me.

Anger towards Monkey makes me sad :(

Posted: Sun Feb 26, 2006 7:33 pm
by Alice the Huswyf
Monkeys are for bating!

Posted: Wed Mar 01, 2006 3:03 pm
by moosiemoosiegander
Right to left for both seams and hemming, and for eyelet holes etc. I work clockwise. Right handed here, too.

Posted: Fri Mar 03, 2006 3:20 am
by Tuppence
Monkeys are for bating!
Shouldn't that be 'basting'?? :twisted:

Posted: Fri Mar 03, 2006 6:18 am
by Everild Sweordbora
I'm now 20, and been sewing for as long as I can remember - I'm right-handed too, but ambidex....ami....both when it comes to sewing. (Ah, come on, it's 5 am. :p ) I just use whatever seams (*cough* Sorry. :roll: ) best with the material, and what it is I'm sewing. If it's awkward sewing right to left, then I sew left to right. If I'm doing an overstitch though, e.g. blanket stitch, it's always up and towards myself.

Posted: Fri Mar 03, 2006 6:14 pm
by Alice the Huswyf
Tuppence, I am SO sorry and indeed you are right.

Monkeys are for basting - with their own juices, while spitted alive and turning slowly over hot coals.