Painting a pavilion

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gallois
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Painting a pavilion

Postby gallois » Thu Jun 25, 2009 4:50 pm

Hi all, I have a plain white tent which I am thinking of painting with decoration. Can anyone recommend the best type of paint to use? The coton canvas has been painted with waterseal. I have seen painted tents in pics but not close up so I dont know if the paint cracks and/or flakes?


"A long bow and a strong bow,
And let the sky grow dark.
The nock to the cord, the shaft to the ear,
And a foreign king for a mark!"

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saracen
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painted pavilion

Postby saracen » Thu Jun 25, 2009 6:31 pm

now it's not authentic believe it or not, but I used acrylics; tent remains waterproof 5 years later, no cracking or peeling... so that's my suggestion for what it's worth. cheers!



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Alice the Huswyf
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Postby Alice the Huswyf » Fri Jun 26, 2009 9:38 am

Don't paint it. Much more versatile for differing events / umbrella organistations.



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gallois
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Postby gallois » Fri Jun 26, 2009 3:13 pm

Thanks for the advice When you say acrylic do you mean artists acrylic or decorators acrylic paints?
I only use this tent for one period (100 years war) so it wont matter that it is time specific. It is also not waterproof as its hand made from 200gm2 cotton. I have to waterseal it every year so Im thinking that painting some panels will reduce the work!


"A long bow and a strong bow,

And let the sky grow dark.

The nock to the cord, the shaft to the ear,

And a foreign king for a mark!"

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saracen
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painted pavilion

Postby saracen » Fri Jun 26, 2009 4:47 pm

oh gosh, now you're getting technical... I've dragged out a bottle of the stuff I used and it's described as All Purpose Acrylic Craft Paint, is water-based and made by Anita's Paints - have done a bit more looking, and it's the first item on this page: http://www.millers-art.co.uk/acatalog/M ... t_525.html
Hope this helps!
Gill



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gregory23b
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Postby gregory23b » Fri Jun 26, 2009 8:18 pm

Be careful which colours you use, I humbly recommend that you do not use:

ultramarine blue or azurite blue, unless your tent is owned by the king. Whilst those colours are cheap as chips today, they were obscenely expensive and I would put money on the unliklihood of a normal tent coming anywhere near the colours.

Second down from that is vermillion

The thing to bear in mind with painting cloth is the amount of paint it takes up, huge amounts in terms of absorbency and weave depth.

The cheaper the colours the more paint you can afford to lay on, I suggest a simple palette of the following colours as they are and were cheap and very common:

red ochre
yellow ochre
lamp black

have three values of each, a light, a mid and a dark tone. Lay on mid tones first, add darks and highlights.

synthetic indigo/woad blue - this is a cool dark blue but is right and proper in terms of cost, dearer than the earth colours above, use mixed with white to extend it.


If you are going the acrylic route, I suggest that you buy the pigments raw and buy the acrylic medium separately, you can mix up enough paint for your requirements and it should work out cheaper. Painting cloth in the way that reenactors paint them uses a load of paint, too much IMHO.

Please note that although some tents were painted, I treat the idea that any old tom dick or harry had a tent let alone painted it as highly dubious and a reenactor led notion. But that as they say is another story.


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Isabela on G23b "...somehow more approachable in real life"

http://medievalcolours.blogspot.com

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gallois
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Postby gallois » Sat Jun 27, 2009 8:46 pm

Thanks to all for the advice. Especially gregory for the last post. Very informative and helpful.


"A long bow and a strong bow,

And let the sky grow dark.

The nock to the cord, the shaft to the ear,

And a foreign king for a mark!"

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Skevmeister
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Postby Skevmeister » Sun Jun 28, 2009 11:57 am

Can

Something G23B told me, when I did a painting course with him. That it's more important to get the colours right rather than the authenticity of the paints. I don't know whther he still agrees with that, but it has always made sense too me.

And having tried to make my own paints I see the sense in it as well.

Alixx


ad augusta per angusta

No Hamster's, Moderators, Animals, or Re-Enactors were harmed in the making of this post.

Skev keeping it real since '86

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gregory23b
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Postby gregory23b » Sun Jun 28, 2009 12:09 pm

I do for the the general reenactment set up, I would rather the proper paint colours in acrylic than the eye dazzling stuff we usually get because modern day colours and techniques of applying them are much more sophisticated.

There is no point in using the right media if you are not using sensible colour schemes for your projects, many fall down at that hurdle, again due to the radical difference in colour price and availability.

Red and yellow ochre are very red and yellow when set next to each other, it is only when we set them next to the really bright colours we are used to that they might seem dull. A look at church wall painting shows often a limited palette, the very expensive colours being used sparingly if at all. Very often the paint is laid down thin, ie enough to do the job, we tend to lay it on so thick that it looks 'solid' from close-up whereas at a few feet and beyond, what might appear patchy ends up looking fine.

Best thing to do is do a sample on some cloth, experiment with the finish, enough to make it look coloured at a distance, then do on the tent. As I said, paint adds weight and too much can clog the weave and crack, thin paint is fine.


middle english dictionary

Isabela on G23b "...somehow more approachable in real life"

http://medievalcolours.blogspot.com

"I know my place." Alice the Huswyf


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