Linen Scraps - a universal mystery?

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ValTarrant
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Linen Scraps - a universal mystery?

Post by ValTarrant »

I'm just cutting out the lining for my kirtle and realised that I was carefully folding even the smallest offcuts into a neat pile for keeping. Even pieces that I can't imagine a use for.

So my question is: at what size do you throw away linen scraps? Or is there another use I could put them to?

Val

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Drachelis
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Post by Drachelis »

I tend to keep anything larger than a thumb nail - scraps are used to reinforce button holes and buttons. Striped are good for interlining edges and binding seams. a little larger and they are cuffs -- waistbands etc

Only thing is that I have so many that get relegated to the barn perhaps once a year and then they are used a cleaning cloths etc

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Brother Ranulf
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Post by Brother Ranulf »

Linen scraps make good charcloth. All you need is a tin with a tiny hole in the lid and a penchant for pyromania . . .
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lidimy
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Post by lidimy »

My smallest bits I use to pad teddy sized jacks. so really anything over an inch square I keep...
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m300572
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Post by m300572 »

lidimy wrote:My smallest bits I use to pad teddy sized jacks. so really anything over an inch square I keep...
Keep the really tiny treeny bits as well Lidi, then your teddies could be equipped with very small tinderboxes with authenti-charcloth! :lol:
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lidimy
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Post by lidimy »

m300572 wrote:
lidimy wrote:My smallest bits I use to pad teddy sized jacks. so really anything over an inch square I keep...
Keep the really tiny treeny bits as well Lidi, then your teddies could be equipped with very small tinderboxes with authenti-charcloth! :lol:
I'm going to have to try that now!!

Could use one of those baby jamjars you get for breakfast in posh hotels... :lol: :lol:
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Post by lucy the tudor »

Oh no, you need tiny teddy tinderboxes, they would be fun to make.
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Colin Middleton
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Post by Colin Middleton »

lidimy wrote:Could use one of those baby jamjars you get for breakfast in posh hotels... :lol: :lol:
Is it a good idea to put a glass jar in a fire?
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lidimy
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Post by lidimy »

I thought that was how you made charcloth? By sticking linen bits in a jam jar with a hole in the lid or something?
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Post by narvek »

I would vote for use of tin can, glass in the fire....not really good idea... 8)
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Post by m300572 »

Colin Middleton wrote:
lidimy wrote:Could use one of those baby jamjars you get for breakfast in posh hotels... :lol: :lol:
Is it a good idea to put a glass jar in a fire?
Depends on how much you value your eyesite.

A tin would be a better idea Lidi.
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Post by Colin Middleton »

Oggy used a metal sweet tin. If you want to do it on an industrial scale, you can use the catering size coffee tins. Your principal is right, knock a hole in the top and watch the fumes squirt out. The problem with the jar (if I'm correct) if the tendancy of glass to shatter when you heat it directly. Do you have any contacts in the chemistry department? They might even want to join in the experiment!
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Post by lidimy »

:shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:

Oooh why on earth did I think of a glass then?

How do you put a hole in the top of a tin can? or do you just leave the lid off?
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Post by guthrie »

From my live journal a couple of years ago:
Next I carbonized some linen in a glass jar. Yes, I know glass jars aren’t very strong. That’s why I was wearing safety glasses. But modern glass jars are strong enough, and I wanted to be able to watch the process.
Before, it looked like this:
<a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank"><img src="http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p62/ ... onisat.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket"></a>

During the process, it looked like this:
<a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank"><img src="http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p62/ ... nising.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket"></a>

You can see wisps of smoke coming out the hole in the top. By this stage the glass had cracked all around, due I think to the 2 to 300C heat being applied and the temperature differential between the cool top of the jar and hot bottom. This sort of exercise is best done with a metal can, because it can take the temperature differentials. You can see various tars condensed up at the top of the jar. These have come from the breakdown of the cellulose in the fibre, and in fact the breakdown should be similar to the cellulose rayon fibres we use at work. Indeed, the partially carbonized linen has a strange feel to it, very smooth and shiny, yet flexible, and this feel is a bit like some of the partially carbonized fibres I have seen at work.

The end product looked like this:
<a href="http://photobucket.com" target="_blank"><img src="http://i125.photobucket.com/albums/p62/ ... dlinen.jpg" border="0" alt="Photo Sharing and Video Hosting at Photobucket"></a>

I had to quickly take it out the broken glass jar with the process incomplete, and dump it in water to stop it burning in air. But some of that will be useable to start a fire.

Unfortunately I couldn’t get a good spark with my flint and steel, so I shall save the linen for another time.

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