15th C Huke/Hulke - medieval poncho?

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The Methley Archer
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15th C Huke/Hulke - medieval poncho?

Post by The Methley Archer »

Is there pictorial evidence of this type of outer/traveling garment know as huke, which is akin to a mordern poncho. All I have found is a modern artists inpresion in Ospreys Longbowman, early interpretation in Dorothy Hartley's Medieval Costume and how to Recreate It, a model wearing his in Gery Embletons Medieval Soldier and a reference to a garment that Joan of Arc was wearing when she was captured (this was richly decorated).

Any help greatly appretiated.

Thanks

Chris
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wulfenganck
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Post by wulfenganck »

Hi, are you sure about the writing "huke". I know the term "heuke" in german.
It seems to be a rather doubtful term, because very often one and the same thing seemed to be named differently, Heuke seems to be one of a couple of names for that oiter gamrent you described.

A very useful source for period paintings/illustrations has been the IMAReal Server http://www.imareal.oeaw.ac.at/realonline/
It has a very good search-function. It's in german,'though, but for heuke go like this:
open up the side, go to the first menuepoint and choose "Kleidung" (= clothing); for "Zeitraum" (= period) mark the period of interest.
Then you can either scroll down the catalogue of clothung terms ("nächster Begriff = next term; "Zeige Bilder" = show pictures) or type the term you're looking for in the bottom field, then go for "Zeige Bilder" = show pictures.

Regards
Wolfgang

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behanner
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Post by behanner »

I'm not sure that is the right term for the garment but that is a possible term for the garment. Always try and verify Embletons examples, he's usually pretty good but always double check.
There are several depicted in the BNF Froissart.

Marcus Woodhouse
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Post by Marcus Woodhouse »

Especially as his research is somewhat dated and full of re-enactorisims.
OSTENDE MIHI PECUNIAM!

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IDEEDEE
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Post by IDEEDEE »

Great link wulfenganck. Many thanks.

Yet another first-rate source site from Germany. There seem to be so much good work going on there to make material accessable.

The only image I have to hand showing something poncho-like is a bit late - a landsknecht about 1507ish. Basically it's a bit like a cloak with knotted corners.

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wulfenganck
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Post by wulfenganck »

IDEEDEE wrote:Great link wulfenganck. Many thanks.

Yet another first-rate source site from Germany. There seem to be so much good work going on there to make material accessable.

The only image I have to hand showing something poncho-like is a bit late - a landsknecht about 1507ish. Basically it's a bit like a cloak with knotted corners.
Thanks, but it's from Austria - we all know, what happened, when Germany and Austria got together.......let's better not mix us and them again;-)
To be honest IMAReal is by far outstanding. But it's a first-class source mainly for the area of Austria, northern Italy and partly swiss and southern Germany. For sure you'll have to cross-check for flemish, burgundian, french or english fashion.

The pictures I found so far seemed rather imprecise and without conformity; your description of "a bit like a cloak" seems the closest you'll find.....maybe add: shaped like a bell, without sleeves.
From what I've read it seems to be a quite regular garment since the 14th century, but slightly more often used by women.
It seems to be even unclear whether it was developed in northern german area or brought to Europe via the "route" northern Africa (there being called "haik") - Italy, France - Germany.
A men's heuke seems to be closed on the shoulder, whereas a woman's heuke may be hung on the shoulders like a cloak or even covering the head.

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IDEEDEE
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Post by IDEEDEE »

WHOOPS.....!!! :oops: What a basic error!! Genuine apologies to anyone offended... :oops: That's us inselaffen for you....

My (poor) excuse: Fell in love with the Bayerischen Staatsbibliothek website earlier this year :) Gone all Germanophile ever since...

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