Changing shape of stays

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JC Milwr
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Changing shape of stays

Postby JC Milwr » Sat Apr 19, 2008 3:25 pm

Can anyone point me towards a good book (or just tell me, if it's simple) about the changing shape of stays/corsets?

I'm particularly interested in the change from the restoration until regency fashion appeared 1790ish?), as to a layman they all look similar!

Ta


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Shadowcat
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Postby Shadowcat » Sat Apr 19, 2008 3:48 pm

"Corsets and Crinolines" Norah Waugh - there are gaps though.

"Period Costume for Stage and Screen 1800-1909" Jean Hunnisett actually has drawings of how the shape changes. But the earlier book has drawings too - same title, but date is "1500-1800" if that makes sense.

Or e-mail me?

S



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JC Milwr
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Postby JC Milwr » Sun Apr 20, 2008 1:49 pm

thanks Shadowcat! I might get the Norah Waugh book :)
The Jean Hunnisett seems to be out of print, as the 1500-1800 one is £47 on amazon and the 1800-1909 is £63!


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Postby Annie the Pedlar » Fri Apr 25, 2008 3:40 pm

The Corset by Valerie Steele.
It was my birthday present to myself and I have enjoyed every day I've owned it.



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Miss Costello
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Postby Miss Costello » Fri Apr 25, 2008 3:56 pm

Same as Annie, it was bought for me and has not failed in it's lovely pics and useful text.
K



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Colin Middleton
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Postby Colin Middleton » Mon Apr 28, 2008 12:44 pm

On the subject of corsets, anyone know when they first appear. I've been told of 11th C pictures, but I'm sceptical of that.


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Shadowcat
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Postby Shadowcat » Mon Apr 28, 2008 1:19 pm

In "The History of Underwear" by the Cunningtons, there is a sketch of a "devil" in a so-called corset, but modern scholarship has more or less dismissed this, I believe. Some men's garments in the "medieval" period are called corsets, but women's stays or bodies ( the proper words for them prior to the 19th century, roughly) seem to have become daily wear in the late 16th century. There are paintings of women in garments which are obviously stiffened, but there is no proof that they are wearing corsets/stays/bodies.

Janet Arnold has a drawing of a pair of bodies in Patterns of Fashion 1560-1660, from about 1598. Then there are the "Effigy" stays, dated 1603 - Janet Arnold seemed to think they were made specially for the effigy of Elizabeth (in private conversation). And there are three sets in "Tudor Tailor", based of the effigy stays, and paintings.

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Colin Middleton
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Postby Colin Middleton » Wed Apr 30, 2008 12:50 pm

Thanks Shadowcat, that's what I thought.


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Postby Tuppence » Wed Apr 30, 2008 1:50 pm

Yep, the ones in the cunnington book are based on an original picture that I have a copy of around somewhere.

Although the re-drawn sketch is pretty accurate to the original it's generally believed to be a fantastical item intended to depict the 'modern' (then) practise of lacing dresses and underdresses as evil.

mid - late 16th c for the first bodies that could be called corsets (as in that are boned) - early 16th cnetury here for properly stiffened bodices, though earlier (late C15th) in spain where they were already wearing a kind of proto farthingale by the 1480s. As I often say- I ignore spain for british clothing at this point, cos they were off doing their own wierd things :D


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