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Purse string problem

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 11:51 am
by Lena
I have difficulties in getting my purses to stay shut when I use silk strings. The wool ones just grip to each other and the fabric, so no problems there, but the silk ones just slide open again. Do I need to use some kind of bead near the purse for the silk strings to grip on, or are there any other solutions to this?

/Lena

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 12:56 pm
by sally
How are you making the strings?

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 1:20 pm
by Lena
sally wrote:How are you making the strings?


Fingerloop braiding (one of the round braids from Tak V bowes departed).

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 1:47 pm
by sally
Hmm, should be perfectly fine for the purpose. What about making the opening of the channel in the purse smaller? Put a couple of little stitches in so it pinches round the cord quite tightly. Might that help?

Posted: Fri Aug 10, 2007 1:50 pm
by Lena
Might work. I'll give it a go tonight. Silk is just so irritatingly slippery.

Posted: Sun Aug 12, 2007 10:15 am
by GinaB
How many string are you using for each purse? And, how far part are your holes? That too can make a difference

Posted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 2:22 pm
by ViscontesseD'Asbeau
At some periods, they had two parallel strings - that might work?

Posted: Tue Aug 14, 2007 2:31 pm
by Jim
Lena wrote:Might work. I'll give it a go tonight. Silk is just so irritatingly slippery.


Hah! Yes! At Bodelwyddan I tried on a valvet hood with a silk lining. Needless to say, when I put the hood up, it slid right off my head again and just would not stay put. :?

Posted: Wed Aug 15, 2007 8:59 pm
by Wayland2002
Try putting some bees wax on the strings, it makes them slightly sticky so they won't slip.

Posted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 10:46 am
by Panda
Wayland2002 wrote:Try putting some bees wax on the strings, it makes them slightly sticky so they won't slip.

WOuld that be Irish bees wax? :wink:

Posted: Thu Aug 16, 2007 4:11 pm
by GinaB
Beeswax might help, but don't put too much or you'll loose the sheen of the silk.

Some other things to try - put your holes closer to the top of the bag - this is especially important if the bag is a thicker fabric or lined, as putting the holes closer to the top will reduce some of the bulk which may be stopping the bag from holding together. Likewise, put in a few more holes, again, this will help to reduce the bulk.

You can always add tassels or decorative knots to the end of your purse strings - totally 'correct' to do, and will help to pull the strings downward.

Posted: Fri Aug 17, 2007 2:28 pm
by Lena
Sorry for the delay, but life got in the way a bit. I planned to take in the holes a bit, never got around to it.

The purse strings in the embroidered purse are cotton, and the ones in the wool purse are silk. While the holes in the embroidered purse are smaller (too large holes may be the main problem with the wool purse), the strings are still too slippery.

The holes are c. 15mm (6-7/8th of an inch) apart. Perhaps they should be closer?

I added beads to the purse strings, which makes it a bit better, but not perfect, so that's not a solution.

I think I will have to make much smaller holes in my next purse, and let these two be display cases, or donation material.

Image

Posted: Sun Aug 19, 2007 9:32 am
by GinaB
Lena, your embroidery is beautiful!

Yes, I think that if you were to try a thicker string in the wool purse it might help - and a few more holes. I do think that it probably has to do with the bulk of the fabric. You could also try weighting the ends of the strings with tassels.

Alot of extant silk relic purses do not have finished holes. The laces are simply pushed through the fabric (the fabric is not cut - make a hole with an awl). This of course means there is automatically some friction. So, the silk string against the silk fabric doesn't slip as much - you might want to experiment with that next time. It's odd though -makes you feel as if you haven't finished the job...
:wink:

Posted: Sun Aug 19, 2007 11:57 pm
by ViscontesseD'Asbeau
Far later date (1690s) and a different textile altogether.... but take a look at this knitted woollen purse from the Gunnister burial:

http://nms.scran.ac.uk/database/record. ... 43r614l831

Full pattern is worked out in Richard Rutt's History of Hand Knitting book.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/History-Hand-Kn ... 1931499373

Although not your period it may give a clue as to a solution - there are knitted in loops right from the first row, if I remember rightly so the holes for the string are right up at the top of the purse, as Gina suggested.

Incidentally, in the same book Rutt analyses several early knitted garments, including stockings and caps. I've seen kits for Monmouths for £30 or more but you can knit it a couple of quid's worth of wool (or a few pence worth if you're a spinner), from Rutt's book. :D Worth passing that info on for anyone who wants to have a go at a Mary Rose style (or later) hat, or have a go at any of the Gunnister finds which he also analyses in detail.