Favorite Historica, Period Drama/Action Films.

Anything with a vague historical bent

Moderator: Moderators

User avatar
Sir Thomas Hylton
Posts: 291
Joined: Tue May 26, 2009 10:40 am
Location: NR Burton upon Trent
Contact:

Favorite Historica, Period Drama/Action Films.

Postby Sir Thomas Hylton » Fri May 29, 2009 8:29 pm

I know we all like to slate many of, well nearly all the Period pieces Hollywood & the like seem to churn out. The thing is some of these we can still sit & watch time & time again.

For instance one we can pick holes...

... in Robin Hood Prince of thieves. Robin lands on the South coast before apearing on Hadrians wall, complete with modern concreted infilling... ooops, before finally geting to his Fathers castle which was near the New Forest but meant to be Nearer Nottingham or Loxley... ho hum. There were many far fetched items in the film & the surf dude Robin left much to be desired. However, The Music was great, we got to see Sean Connery do a nice Cameo role & Alan Rickman Made one of the best Vexed Sherrif Of Nottinghams, highly entertaining even with all the gaffs.

However, its not the highest up my list of Favorite period romps. That Honour must surely Go to A Knights Tale. Its got so many clangers in it its unbelievable, & we could all pick holes in it all day & all night long. Thing is Right from the word go its got you enthralled, the Rhythmic Tune from Queen, though clearly out of place, just seems to fit the feel of the film. The Armour in the film was very dodgy in places, but the sheer entertainment value cannot be argued with, the humour brilliant mixed with hints of Chorcer, echo's of Ivanhoe, yes they lifted one or two things, but the real inspiration was the portrayal of Tournaments as the equivelent of massive spectator sports events. Okay again, we can pick holes in this & its historical inacuracys. But there is no denying Rufus was a great baddy. There is a very War weary yet enthusiastic portrayal of a Black Prince, nothing like the history books, but in the end a great telling of a ficticious tale. I can watch this back to back & then again.

I recently bought a special lengthened version of Kingdom of Heaven If you enjoyed the first cinematic version, then you will absolutely love the very much lengthened version. To give you an idea of how long the film becomes, it needs an intermission & a second DVD to show it in its entirety.

I really Love watching 13th Warrior Extremely dodgy ficticious Viking saga. Though it does lift elements from actual sagas. Must say I love the acting & the way Norse develops from unitelagable to understandable over our Hero's Journey with them. Inacurate drivel, though with enough correct to forgive the oddities of certain things. Though I'll admit with the widely traveled Norse & Danes, that they certainly did pick up clothing & armour from all over the known world & include it in their own garb.

There are numerous other Historical bassed films I love, but my three main Faves remain that I can watch over & over again:
A Knights Tale
Kingdom of Heaven
13th Warrior

No matter what their faults

with a begrudging mention for Robin Hood POT for reasons stated earlier. Another interesting though slightly sciFi Film is Timeline Bassed on a Michael Criton Book. Actually the Book is far better than the film, but I can still watch that repeatedly.

What Historical Films stick out that you can sit through end to end & watch it again, that you are prepared to forgive its inacuracies & pure blunders.



Theotherone
Posts: 250
Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2006 7:07 pm

Postby Theotherone » Sat May 30, 2009 12:02 am

well, I'm watching "The Beguiled" again but mostly for the half naked young(ish) Clint Eastwood, so I doubt that that counts :wink:


Because there would have to be three of them.

Eve
Posts: 291
Joined: Sat Aug 20, 2005 9:14 pm

Postby Eve » Sat May 30, 2009 7:55 am

'Master and Commander' - not my period but the trepanning scene is correct. The film's medical advisor was Mick Crumplin, who is a re-enactor as well as a retired surgeon, and curator of the Hunterian Collection at the Royal College of Surgeons. On top of that the film is a good story too!

'Rob Roy' - again not my period but somehow it has 'the feel' of the time. This came out about the same time as 'Braveheart', which is awful.

'The Libertine' - just realised that none of these are periods I re-enact, although this one is close - I saw this as I'd been told there was a scene of Johnny Depp in the bath - yummy - I was disappointed there as you saw nothing! But the 'feel' of the film was superb. It is VERY rude but one of the saddest films I've seen in a long time. What an excellent actor JD is!



User avatar
knight1066
Posts: 75
Joined: Tue Jul 25, 2006 6:06 pm
Location: Coventry

Postby knight1066 » Sat May 30, 2009 10:08 pm

As a historical romp El Cid is a fantastic and enjoyable movie but for historical accuracy in storyline and costume it is totally wrong wrong wrong....However it does have Sophia Loren in it so can be forgiven. Another, but much lesser known, Charlton Heston epic also set during the 11th century called The Warlord is a real treat and much more authentic for the period it is set in.


Death before dishonour...... The battlefield awaits
Mortis Priusquam Inhonesto Acies Exspecto

Theotherone
Posts: 250
Joined: Fri Oct 27, 2006 7:07 pm

Postby Theotherone » Sat May 30, 2009 10:56 pm

knight1066 wrote:As a historical romp El Cid is a fantastic and enjoyable movie but for historical accuracy in storyline and costume it is totally wrong wrong wrong....However it does have Sophia Loren in it so can be forgiven.


CUBA Many years ago I worked with one of the guys who did the horses for El Cid


Because there would have to be three of them.

User avatar
Sir Thomas Hylton
Posts: 291
Joined: Tue May 26, 2009 10:40 am
Location: NR Burton upon Trent
Contact:

Postby Sir Thomas Hylton » Sun May 31, 2009 4:54 am

El Cid is an absolute classic, even with its shortcomings

Master & Commander is in my Faves list as is Gladiator, though I've watched that film to death. I hear Mister Crow is doing a version of Robin Hood. Should be interesting when that comes out.

There were a couple of Joan of Arc films a few years ago released about the same time, one was great fun, the other was not so good.

To go slightly off topic I really rate the Bernard Cornwell Books & I think more than the Sharpe Novels should make their way onto the screen. The Warlord Series was excelent. There are things he writes about that I have problems with certain details, but seems a pity film makers have ignored him to the most part.



User avatar
knight1066
Posts: 75
Joined: Tue Jul 25, 2006 6:06 pm
Location: Coventry

Postby knight1066 » Sun May 31, 2009 11:44 am

Totally agree about Bernard Cornwell. Absolutely love the grail quest series "Harlequin" "Vagabond" and "Heretic"

Currently reading "Azincourt" which is a loose sequel to the grail quest series.

Another fantastic series of books by BC are the Alfred sagas. "The Last Kingdom" "The Pale Horseman" "The Lords of the North" and "Sword Song" Highly recommended


Death before dishonour...... The battlefield awaits

Mortis Priusquam Inhonesto Acies Exspecto

User avatar
Brendan C
Posts: 307
Joined: Wed Aug 17, 2005 2:17 pm
Location: Southampton, Hampshire

Postby Brendan C » Sun May 31, 2009 6:41 pm

The Lion in Winter, starring Peter O'Toole, along with a superb Katherine Hepburn as Eleanor of Aquitaine and an incredibly young Anthony Hopkins, Timothy Dalton and Nigel Terry.

An amazing film - shows just how insanely dangerous the Angevin Court of the late 12th century was

Brendan C



Marcus Woodhouse
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 3337
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:35 pm

Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Sun May 31, 2009 8:23 pm

I have a guilty pleasure thing with Saving Private Ryan because it is meant to be SOOOOOO authentic that i just can't help myself from looking eagle eyed for errors (and there are lots) and explaining why the sniper could never do what he did, why the squad would have been wiped out in five seconds flat in that final scene and so on.
I really don't have a problem with films (or groups) who are just about having fun and making people feel good, its when you hear all about the increadiable research, the costumes, the set design and so on and then see somehting that is pure shite that bugs me.
So Knights Tale I could live with, Joan of Arc was pants.


OSTENDE MIHI PECUNIAM!

User avatar
Sir Thomas Hylton
Posts: 291
Joined: Tue May 26, 2009 10:40 am
Location: NR Burton upon Trent
Contact:

Postby Sir Thomas Hylton » Sun May 31, 2009 8:32 pm

Ah, but there were two versions of Joan of arc released within 12 months of each other. Neither were brilliant. One was pure pants & the other was mostly a good romp. Its a while since I've seen either so I'm sure If I were to watch it again I'd want to pull it to bits.

Much as I was watching some DVD's of the 1980's Robin of Sherwood last night & couldn't believe how bad certain things were & why I never noticed all the way through the first series the mail was fake material mail. Didn't know whether to laugh or cry.



User avatar
Brendan C
Posts: 307
Joined: Wed Aug 17, 2005 2:17 pm
Location: Southampton, Hampshire

Postby Brendan C » Sun May 31, 2009 8:55 pm

Sir Thomas Hylton wrote:Much as I was watching some DVD's of the 1980's Robin of Sherwood last night & couldn't believe how bad certain things were & why I never noticed all the way through the first series the mail was fake material mail.


Still better than BBC's 'Robin Hood'

Brendan c



User avatar
nerf herder
Posts: 33
Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 5:56 pm
Location: "The Bunker"

Postby nerf herder » Mon Jun 01, 2009 1:50 pm

A pile of horse sh** is better than BBC's Robin Hood

Nerfy


"It's a mother beautiful bridge, and it's gonna be there...."

User avatar
Medicus Matt
Post Knight
Posts: 1470
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 1:16 pm
Location: Zummerzet
Contact:

Postby Medicus Matt » Mon Jun 01, 2009 2:08 pm

nerf herder wrote:A pile of horse sh** is better than BBC's Robin Hood

Nerfy


Nerfy, I admire and envy you your critical faculties as I find it impossible to tell the difference between the two.

You can take Robin Hoody, Robin Hood POT and all the rest of them and shove them up your Lincoln Green-clad botties.
Connery and Hepburn in 'Robin and Marion' is the only one worth watching.


"I never said that I was here to help."

User avatar
knight1066
Posts: 75
Joined: Tue Jul 25, 2006 6:06 pm
Location: Coventry

Postby knight1066 » Mon Jun 01, 2009 2:14 pm

Anyone seen the 1991 Robin Hood film starring Patrick Bergin and Uma Thurman.....?

Came out the same year as Robin Hood Prince of Thieves but made on a much lower budget. Yes, you could drive a whole baggage train through the holes in historical accuracy (Although does a fictional/fantasy film really need to be historically accurate.....?) I thought it was a much better version of the legend than RHPOT.

No doubt someone out there will have seen the film and totally disagree!!!!


Death before dishonour...... The battlefield awaits

Mortis Priusquam Inhonesto Acies Exspecto

User avatar
Sir Thomas Hylton
Posts: 291
Joined: Tue May 26, 2009 10:40 am
Location: NR Burton upon Trent
Contact:

Postby Sir Thomas Hylton » Mon Jun 01, 2009 4:05 pm

knight1066 wrote:Anyone seen the 1991 Robin Hood film starring Patrick Bergin and Uma Thurman.....?

Came out the same year as Robin Hood Prince of Thieves but made on a much lower budget. Yes, you could drive a whole baggage train through the holes in historical accuracy (Although does a fictional/fantasy film really need to be historically accurate.....?) I thought it was a much better version of the legend than RHPOT.

No doubt someone out there will have seen the film and totally disagree!!!!


I saw bothe films when they st came out & at the time certainly rated the P Burgin film much higher. Saw it again recently on the inferior ITV & the commercials spoilt the whole effect.

As for the BBC's current version of Robin Hood. Its entertaining, though at times certain things don't sit well with myself. The Tounge in cheek nature of it is refreshing, but I can fully understand why certain people wouldn't like the new version.

As for the Sean Connery Robin & Marion. It is a real classic & the rough edged way it was portrayed I really liked & it told part of the Story rarely delt with.



Ellen Gethin
Posts: 96
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2006 11:03 pm
Location: Hay-on-Wye, town of books

Postby Ellen Gethin » Tue Jun 02, 2009 8:13 pm

I thought the Patrick Bergin film was far superior to Prince of Thieves, too. I liked the way Robin was mostly enjoying himself, and then his friend would say "But if you do it this way, you'll get the support of the peasants."
However, far and away the best Robin Hood ever still has to be Errol Flynn!

The Sea Hawk, Flynn's other great historical swashbuckler, is another of my favourites, partly for the Elizabethan plotline, and partly because it is such a magnificent propaganda film to give heart to the English people in the darkest days of the Second World War. And it has a truly great scene right at the beginning - everyone in the cinema would have come to see Errol Flynn, but they draw out the moment as long as they possibly can, moving the camera slowly along the ship, until finally they show the quarterdeck, and there he is.

The 13th Warrior, Kingdom of Heaven and The Knight's Tales are modern favourites - because they're like the best of the old swashbucklers.

And let's not forget the Court Jester, with Danny Kaye.
"The chalice from the Palace holds the brew that is true."


"Take wrong turns, talk to strangers, open unmarked doors. And if you see a group of people in a field, go find out what they're doing."
JimmyB27, absolutewrite

Gail Horn
Posts: 191
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2005 7:53 pm
Location: Not sure if I'm even on this planet...

Postby Gail Horn » Wed Jun 03, 2009 6:51 am

And let's not forget the Court Jester, with Danny Kaye.
"The chalice from the Palace holds the brew that is true."


Oh yea, verily, yea! :D

Love that film!


My mind not only wanders - sometimes it leaves completely!

User avatar
Brother Kevfael
Posts: 127
Joined: Wed Oct 25, 2006 2:42 pm
Location: Dudley
Contact:

Postby Brother Kevfael » Wed Jun 03, 2009 8:37 am

Flynn's Robin Hood and Sea Hawk will always be great. But I also like Captain Blood, The Black Swan and Scaramouche, (The latter four were all based on books by Rafael Sabatini, who you don't hear much of these days, which I think is a pity).

I also enjoy Excalibur, (sod the history enjoy the spectacle); All the musketeerwith oliver reed et al for the energy and fun;The man in the iron mask, ( forget Di Crappio. Jeremy Irons, Gerard Depardieu, John Malkovich and Gabriel Byrne make the film.). The Count of monte Cristo with Richard Chamberlin and Cyrano de Bergerac with Gerard Depardieu.

Bring back Sabatini and Dumas!



User avatar
Sir Thomas Hylton
Posts: 291
Joined: Tue May 26, 2009 10:40 am
Location: NR Burton upon Trent
Contact:

Postby Sir Thomas Hylton » Wed Jun 03, 2009 7:54 pm

Tbest thing about Excaibur was Merlin, played by Nicol Williamson, an excellent shaksperian actor with bucket loads of dead pan humour in all his acting. Okay, real liberties were take with time period dress etc, but it wasn't a bad telling of the Arthurian Myth.

Watched Nicol Williamson Play Hamlet the other evening & it was a riveting telling brought to life by Mr Williamson in a way I've never seen done before.



User avatar
steve stanley
Post Knight
Posts: 1122
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2005 6:07 pm
Location: Leicester

Postby steve stanley » Wed Jun 03, 2009 8:51 pm

Not that I'm biased.......
Last of the Mohicans
Northwest Passage
Drums along the Mohawk

And right up in the 1860's...
Ride with the Devil
Glory

And,as mentioned above,nearly anything Flynn made!
Steve


"Give me a tent and a kettle
Snowshoes and axe and gun
Send me up in Grand River
Steering by star and sun".
- Labrador Trapper's Song

Handbag
Posts: 156
Joined: Wed Oct 12, 2005 7:18 pm

Postby Handbag » Wed Jun 03, 2009 9:11 pm

I really enjoyed Beowulf and Grendel - directed by Sturla Gunnarsson. the scenery was stunning and characterisation good - not a period i re-enact but im guessing the costume wasnt great (but when are they?) but the rest of the Film made up for it



User avatar
Brendan C
Posts: 307
Joined: Wed Aug 17, 2005 2:17 pm
Location: Southampton, Hampshire

Postby Brendan C » Fri Jun 05, 2009 10:38 pm

Sir Thomas Hylton wrote:Okay, real liberties were take with time period dress etc, but it wasn't a bad telling of the Arthurian Myth.


It is the best King Arthur film to date, but the thing to remember is that John Boorman (the director) was thinking purely in terms of 'L'morte d'Arthur' as oppossed to an authenti-historical version.

Boorman filmed this because he couldn't get the funding to film 'Lord of the Rings'

Brendan C



User avatar
Sir Thomas Hylton
Posts: 291
Joined: Tue May 26, 2009 10:40 am
Location: NR Burton upon Trent
Contact:

Postby Sir Thomas Hylton » Sat Jun 06, 2009 12:28 am

Brendan C wrote:
Sir Thomas Hylton wrote:Okay, real liberties were take with time period dress etc, but it wasn't a bad telling of the Arthurian Myth.


It is the best King Arthur film to date, but the thing to remember is that John Boorman (the director) was thinking purely in terms of 'L'morte d'Arthur' as oppossed to an authenti-historical version.

Boorman filmed this because he couldn't get the funding to film 'Lord of the Rings'

Brendan C


Indeed Brendan

I know he was doing the Morte version, yet there was almost a timlessness about much of the film. Out of time all together. So could have been 4th - 5thC as much as 14thC, or any time inbetween. Or even no time at all.Interesting you should mention LOTR



Ellen Gethin
Posts: 96
Joined: Fri Apr 21, 2006 11:03 pm
Location: Hay-on-Wye, town of books

Postby Ellen Gethin » Sat Jun 06, 2009 5:59 pm

I think Excalibur just goes to show that it's okay to be inauthentic as long as you understand the myth
Something that the recent King Arthur film - and the BBC Robin Hood - obviously failed to grasp.


"Take wrong turns, talk to strangers, open unmarked doors. And if you see a group of people in a field, go find out what they're doing."

JimmyB27, absolutewrite

Marcus Woodhouse
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 3337
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:35 pm

Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Mon Jun 08, 2009 1:13 pm

Along with the people who moan on about them.

I mean how can a legend be authentic? That's why it's a legend for goodness sake!
And how can a myth, by it's nature a supernatural act that is used to explain a natural feat (and therefore an act of faith) be proved/disproved or historically contained?

King Arthur and Robin Hood are archetypes, not historical characters.


OSTENDE MIHI PECUNIAM!

User avatar
Medicus Matt
Post Knight
Posts: 1470
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 1:16 pm
Location: Zummerzet
Contact:

Postby Medicus Matt » Mon Jun 08, 2009 1:35 pm

Marcus Woodhouse wrote:
King Arthur and Robin Hood are archetypes, not historical characters.


Yes, but if you're then going to make a film which states (as part of it's strapline) that it's "The Truth Behind the Legend" and claims to ground itself firmly in a specific period of history then I don't think it'sunreasonable to poke holes in it if it's a sack of crap in terms of period costume, weapons,armour, events etc.

Especially if the film itself lacks any merit as a piece of cinematography.

That's why Excalibur rocks (although it could do with being half an hour shorter) and KA does not.

Or why I like Braveheart, which was well acted and entertaining despite being utter tosh.

Watched 'The Longest Day' on Saturday (as you do on 6th of the 6th)...now THAT'S a good historical film.


"I never said that I was here to help."

Marcus Woodhouse
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 3337
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:35 pm

Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Mon Jun 08, 2009 4:12 pm

Hang on in one of my earlier postings I do think that i made it clear that I don't like the films that claim to be historically accurate (I used Saving Private Ryan as an example) but that i have a lot of time for films like Knights Tale which plays fast and loose with facts but is a lot of fun.
Gladiator, King Arthur, Kingdom of Heaven all rile me to a greater or lesser degree because that is what they did. Give me an old cowboy and western over them aby day.


OSTENDE MIHI PECUNIAM!

User avatar
Malvoisin
Posts: 275
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2005 11:02 am
Location: Bulewelle

Postby Malvoisin » Mon Jun 08, 2009 7:26 pm

Handbag wrote:I really enjoyed Beowulf and Grendel - directed by Sturla Gunnarsson. the scenery was stunning and characterisation good - not a period i re-enact but im guessing the costume wasnt great (but when are they?) but the rest of the Film made up for it


I'm right with you on that one. Low budget (Grendel is just a big ugly bloke in fur) but beautifully filmed in Iceland and very atmospheric. Also the little Icelandic ponies trotting around ridden by maille clad soldiers was a joy.

For more recent history 2 films to watch back to back.
First Waltz with Bashir about the Isreali invasion of Lebanon in 1982 and the writer/director Ari Folmans trouble in coming to terms with what happened during that war and trying to understand his involvment, as an IDF soldier, in the massacres at the Sabra and Shatila refugee camps.
Real life interviews and commentry set to superb animation.

Second Beaufort about the very last days of the occupation of Lebanon in 2000. The slow pace of this film really brings home the grinding bordom for the young conscripts fighting a lost war occasionally interrupted by pointless deaths and extreme acts of violence, from an unseen enemy. Chilling and very poignant.


Oh and the extended version of Kingdom of Heaven. Tops! :D


Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses... In peacetime

User avatar
Medicus Matt
Post Knight
Posts: 1470
Joined: Mon Jul 18, 2005 1:16 pm
Location: Zummerzet
Contact:

Postby Medicus Matt » Tue Jun 09, 2009 8:38 am

Marcus Woodhouse wrote:Give me an old cowboy


With or without leather chaps?


"I never said that I was here to help."

User avatar
Botwot
Posts: 36
Joined: Sun Jul 09, 2006 7:34 pm
Location: Northumberland

Postby Botwot » Wed Jun 10, 2009 8:40 am

I think I'll have to plump for "The Three Musketeers/The Four Musketeers" the 1973/4 versions with Michael York, Oliver Reed, Frank Finlay, Richard Chamberlain, Christopher Lee, Faye Dunaway, Raquel Welch, Roy Kinnear etc etc.

Favourite bits; the mock brawl in the inn to get food and drink; the bet at the siege of La Rochelle and the scrap in the Dye house.

Martin


A railway station is where a train stops
A bus station is where a bus stops
I am sitting at a workstation......


Return to “Book, Film, TV & Music Reviews”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest