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Sugar Cones

Posted: Thu Nov 23, 2006 9:58 am
by Lindsay
Can anyone recommend somewhere that sells sugar cones? All my web searches turn up is wafers for ice cream!

Posted: Thu Nov 23, 2006 1:27 pm
by gregory23b
You might need a contact in Iran, not joking.

Try asking Pete the Pong.

Posted: Thu Nov 23, 2006 4:03 pm
by Fillionous
Pete the Pong imported some last year and sold out in a flash, So I would contact him and hope he can get some more.

Be bright, be bold
Fillionous

Posted: Tue Nov 28, 2006 9:26 am
by Annie the Pedlar
I made mine.
After a lot of failure it was get some brown sugar, dampen it and mould it by hand a la Close Encounters.
I tried wetting it - fell to pieces.
I tried moulding it in various vessels- bits fell off when being unmoulded.
My successful one lasted 4 years until the next door cars moved house and mice invaded my store room (OK - garage -) and nibbled bits out of it. My latest one is 2 years old and kept in the house.

Does anyone know whether the shape was a dome (sugar loaf) or taller and pointed (sugar cone)? I'm thinking for Tudor......expecting it varied with time and place?

Posted: Tue Nov 28, 2006 9:37 am
by sally
You can get blocks of rather sticky raw sugar under the name jaggery goor in some global supermarkets (the really big tescos somethnes have it as well), sort of a pudding basin shape, but you could claim you've used up the pointy top part. We've also experimented with damping down sugar and squishing it into a mould, best results came from using a waxed paper cone inside a mould, was a bit easier to peel off after it had set, but as has been mentioned it took a few goes to get it to work

Posted: Tue Nov 28, 2006 9:40 am
by sally
Just did a search and this place has jaggery goor, but in blocks not the lumps we get. Its a good unrefined sugar though and probably a better type than modern granular sugar for a lot of historic cooking

http://www.spicesofindia.co.uk/acatalog ... ggery.html

Posted: Mon Jan 15, 2007 8:15 pm
by Wayland2002
I can get raw palm sugar cones if thats any help, the're not very expensive.

Email me if you want me to get one

Posted: Mon Jan 15, 2007 11:58 pm
by Hinny Annie
Make friends with a german reenactor and get them to bring some over. My husband is from Bavaria and they are really common in all the supermarkets there. Unfortunately for you lot he now lives in Northumberland with me

Posted: Tue Jan 16, 2007 1:15 am
by Theotherone
Annie the Pedlar wrote:Does anyone know whether the shape was a dome (sugar loaf) or taller and pointed (sugar cone)? I'm thinking for Tudor......expecting it varied with time and place?


There appears to be one on the small table bottom left in this pic
http://www.pbm.com/~lindahl/food-art/large_kitchen.pdf
Its apparently an illustration from Il Cuoco Segreto Di Papa Pio V (The Private Chef of Pope Pius V), by Bartolomeo Scappi, Venice, 1570. If that's any use?

Posted: Tue Jan 16, 2007 11:00 am
by Annie the Pedlar
Ah... do you think? I've looked at that picture loads of times and never twigged.
Thankyou
Annie

Somebody hit me on the head and stop me thinking - Hinny Annie + Northumberland x my mum + Teeside = me cornering the world market in sugar cones. :twisted:

Posted: Tue Jan 16, 2007 11:01 am
by Annie the Pedlar
Ah... do you think? I've looked at that picture loads of times and never twigged.
Thankyou
Annie

Somebody hit me on the head and stop me thinking - Hinny Annie + Northumberland x my mum + Teeside = me cornering the world market in sugar cones. :twisted:

Posted: Tue Jan 16, 2007 12:50 pm
by Theotherone
I wouldn't have either, Only I was looking for something that led me to a recepie page that led me to something on kitchens ( http://www.katjaorlova.com/MedievalKitchenEquipment.htm )which mentioned that this was a sugar cone but all the illustrations had got mangled so I had to find the source of the picture which led me to the site I posted elsewhere

Did find out one of the ways Sugar Cones came about –
What is a Cone Sugar?
Cone sugar was the product when sugar was separated from molasses before centrifuges were developed in the late 1800's. The sugar-molasses mix was poured into small vertical cones which had a hole in the bottom. The molasses would drain out the hole, leaving the sugar in a cone shaped block. The cones were usually held for a few days in a heated room to speed up the molasses drainage. Water could be poured over the top of the cone to wash some of the molasses out.
Nippers, similar to pliers were used to break lumps of the sugar from the cones for use.”

( from http://www.amalgamatedsugar.com/sugarfaq.htm)

This mentions post medieval finds of sugar cone molds found in Southampton (no pics) http://sccwww1.southampton.gov.uk/archa ... d&start=20

One in Chester (again no pic) http://www.chester.gov.uk/amphitheatre/ ... m_2004.htm

And here’s a bloke showing an 18thC one to some scouts http://www.captainselinscompany.org/cub ... rcone.html

Posted: Tue Jan 16, 2007 2:01 pm
by sally
There is a fourteenth century picture and some moulds here
http://www.hist.unizh.ch/ag/paphos/proj ... start.html

Posted: Tue Jan 16, 2007 2:30 pm
by Theotherone
I'd alredy started having a go at one using greaseproof paper and a jug in a set up a bit like fig 7...

Posted: Tue Jan 16, 2007 3:02 pm
by Annie the Pedlar
That's brilliant.
The cones are pottery. I wonder how they got the sugar out. Mine stuck to earthenware. I wonder if they are glazed inside..........

Posted: Tue Jan 16, 2007 11:23 pm
by Theotherone
Doesn't appear so from these reconstructions in Exeterhttp://www.exeter.gov.uk/timetrai ... ref=10_118

Wizz down to the bottomish quarter of this page and it tells you about the neatening up of cones in the mid 1800's http://home.clara.net/mawer/usefularts.html

Posted: Wed Jan 17, 2007 7:36 am
by sally
I'm sure I've seen pottery cones in the garden centre- sort of novelty hanging flower pots. I must have another look, I really want to have a go at making one in a pottery cone. We've had a go using waxed paper cones, want to try this now :)

Sugar cones and salt cones

Posted: Wed Jan 17, 2007 8:22 am
by CeDeBe
I read that salt cones were formed in ceramic cones that were then broken to remove the salt. Perhaps the sugar cones were formed in the same way?

Posted: Wed Jan 17, 2007 9:26 am
by Annie the Pedlar
Actually, practically if not authentically speaking, it's easy enough to put a cone of greaseproof (or waxed) paper inside the pottery cone.
Anyone remember corner shops making inverted paper cones to hold our penny sweets - or even ha'penny chews -? (imagine a wrinkly emoticon with white hair).

For anyone who hasn't tried it grease proofpaper makes a good release mechanism.

Posted: Wed Jan 17, 2007 1:51 pm
by Theotherone
sally wrote:I'm sure I've seen pottery cones in the garden centre- sort of novelty hanging flower pots. I must have another look, I really want to have a go at making one in a pottery cone. We've had a go using waxed paper cones, want to try this now :)


They still (apparently) make sugar cone moulds in mexico. There are a lot of US firms that turn them into candle/flower holders, These are usually made of wood
http://cgi.ebay.com/6-Hole-Wooden-Sugar ... dZViewItem

You can get metal liners for them
http://item.express.ebay.com/Antiques_C ... xpressItem

But there are some "original" ones about
http://item.express.ebay.com/Antiques_C ... xpressItem

Most of these are the truncated versions though

Posted: Thu Feb 08, 2007 8:23 pm
by Marcus Woodhouse
Do you mind me asking what your going to do with it? Are you going to be trying to display your stuff? If you are could you let us know where you'll be at as I'd like to see what your all about, omae.