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Soup

Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 3:56 pm
by Sir Jarvis Phelps
I know nout about C15 cooking so I'd like to start learning. Mrs is away working while I've got the day off so I'd like to make her a nice soup for when she comes in.

Any recipe suggestions please? :D

Re: Soup

Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 5:03 pm
by Karen Larsdatter
You can find a lot of 15th century recipes at http://moas.atlantia.sca.org/wsnlinks/i ... &catid=700

My husband cooked a 15th century Italian recipe for a ravioli soup from the Libro de arte coquinaria composto per lo egregio Maestro Martino. You can find his version of that recipe (and others from that feast) online at http://www.geocities.com/karen_larsdatter/gruffmenu.pdf

Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 7:19 pm
by Cat
Oohh, I've got a wicked one for almond soup, but with no precise dating on. I'll dig it out this evening for you.

Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 7:20 pm
by craig1459
Thanks Karen

I thought of asking you but thought I'd kick start this forum :D

That sounds great Cat - cheers - I can see me doing different soups the rest of the week now :D

Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 7:29 pm
by Lady Cecily
Oxtail is good for this time of the year if you have the time to make it.

Coat your oxtail pieces in seasoned flour, fry some onions and the oxtail pieces. Cover with water and stew until the meat falls off the bone. Strain the bits from liquid remove the meat from the bones and add back to the liquid.

Thicken with a bit of cornflour if you feel it's too thin. It's going to take a few hours but it's simple and delicious.

Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 10:25 pm
by Cat
Damn, can't find it, but it's quite an early medieval soup based on chicken stock, thickened with ground almonds and flavoured quite heavily with garlic.

The earlier soups tend to be thickened with whole or crushed grains (like wheat or oats), or breadcrumbs. Really posh soup was thickened with 'amidon', finely sifted wheat flour.

A tremendously exclusive soup from the early 1400s was good (fish?)stock in which you seethe rice then add almond milk (mix ground almonds with water or milk, strain and use the liquid) and saffron, if you like the taste. It was sometimes sugared. It was eaten on fish days.

Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 10:28 pm
by Cat
Oh, and if you want to make it auth**tic, then you need to serve it with some good bread in the bowl, or a crisped bread roll, or (again for best) a small seethed chicken or pheasant that you boiled in the stock. Not the chicken on fish days, obviously...

Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 10:49 pm
by Lady Cecily
Roe Deer Broth

Take Roe deer meat, cook it in small pieces in a half water, half wine mixture. Mix bread and blood and mix it with, ginger, cinnamon, mace and a large quantity of vinegar and currants.

My own translation from the forme of cury. Not tested. Let me know if you do.

Posted: Mon Mar 06, 2006 10:53 pm
by temporary guy
The Pepys* cook book talks about broth a lot, often for restorative purposes.


*15thC in his library. "Stir it well"

Will have to re-read it.

Posted: Tue Mar 07, 2006 1:37 pm
by Nigel
Ok soup something Iam a bit good at

Good one is onion and mushroom with madeira I'll post full recipee tommorrow if you wish

Posted: Tue Mar 07, 2006 1:41 pm
by Grymm
This is my attempt at a transcription of the one of the broths from Pepys Mssssses

To make grewell of fors*n

Take mary bones of ffresche beef and make goode grewell ther of then draw htt throwgh a straynner. Take fayre porke tendyr sodyn take away the skynne and the bonys and the senose. Then grynde htt yn a mortar small and tempyr htt up with the same grewell that ys drawn* make htt smoth let htt stond resonabyll by þe flesch seson htt up with salte and saferon then set htt to the fyre and let ht boyle and Ser (all as 1 composite letter)ve

*The character here is a small anti clock swirl that looks like an 8 or 9 on its side, I’m not sure what it’s a symbol for, perhaps TG may be able to throw some light on it?

Grymm

Posted: Tue Mar 07, 2006 2:06 pm
by Cat
What about the cock-ale, where you take a cock and flea him, and bray him in a mortar all to smalle, then bung the poor squished beast into a barrel of ale, and leave it a couple of weeks until the bird has dissolved...

Incidentally, the really old thickened blancmanges were thickened with teased out white chicken meat, stirred in milk/almond milk over a slow fire with rosewater intil the chicken protein set the whole; I was on Zakynthos about 17 years ago, and for their saint's day the old women make almost eactly the same recipe. It takes about 3 hours of constant stirring, and the recipe is of Moorish origin.

Posted: Tue Mar 07, 2006 2:51 pm
by temporary guy
Grymm, that is (not knowing the technical term) an end line flourish, it appears on most of the recipe titles. Looks like a girt big comma basically.

yes sve - serve. Common to contract stuff.
htt - hit - it

Ht - hyt - it.

Pbt est - probatum est for example in medical recipes - proven to work.


Bloody good transcription mate.

If you haven't already check out the paleography link on my website, has some great excercises for learning to read mejeeval. Most you will already be well familiar with.

Posted: Tue Mar 07, 2006 5:30 pm
by moosiemoosiegander
Here's a nice recipe from the Forme of Cury for Chebolace, or Savoury Green Soup (transcribed very workably in the Pleyn Delit cookery book by Constance B. Hieatt, Brenda Hosington and Sharon Butler)

2-3 bunches of spring onions
2lbs spinach or other green leafy vegetable
Sprigs of parsley and other fresh herbs (optional)
2-3 cups chicken broth/stock
1/2 teaspoon sugar
pinch each of ground cardamom and coriander
6 egg yolks or 3 eggs, well beaten
1 tbsp rice flour, dissolved in 1/4 cup of milk
salt to taste

Wash and trim green onions, greens and optional herbs. Put in a kettle of boiling chicken broth nd boil for 3-4 minutes.
Drain vegetables, reserving the broth, and puree in a blender (or you can squidge it through a colander or seive)

Return to pan with reserved broth and bring to a slow simmer

Mix flour with milk to produce a smooth paste, and add to the beaten eggs and stir until soup is nicely thickened.

Taste before adding seasonings and if broth was salty, you may not need to add more salt.

Good luck, and I hope you like it, and the original recipe can also be supplied if you want it.

Posted: Tue Mar 07, 2006 5:33 pm
by moosiemoosiegander
Here's a nice recipe from the Forme of Cury for Chebolace, or Savoury Green Soup (transcribed very workably in the Pleyn Delit cookery book by Constance B. Hieatt, Brenda Hosington and Sharon Butler)

2-3 bunches of spring onions
2lbs spinach or other green leafy vegetable
Sprigs of parsley and other fresh herbs (optional)
2-3 cups chicken broth/stock
1/2 teaspoon sugar
pinch each of ground cardamom and coriander
6 egg yolks or 3 eggs, well beaten
1 tbsp rice flour, dissolved in 1/4 cup of milk
salt to taste

Wash and trim green onions, greens and optional herbs. Put in a kettle of boiling chicken broth nd boil for 3-4 minutes.
Drain vegetables, reserving the broth, and puree in a blender (or you can squidge it through a colander or seive)

Return to pan with reserved broth and bring to a slow simmer

Mix flour with milk to produce a smooth paste, and add to the beaten eggs and stir until soup is nicely thickened.

Taste before adding seasonings and if broth was salty, you may not need to add more salt.

Good luck, and I hope you like it, and the original recipe can also be supplied if you want it.

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2006 10:31 am
by Wayland2002
Craig

As Sara is a veggie how about 'shroom soup, its not authentic but its nice:

500g of shrooms
1/2 L of veg stock
butter
corn flour
cream or elmlea
parsley

Gently fry the mushrooms in the butter,
remove 3/4 of the shroom and blitz them in a blender. leave the rest of the shrooms in chuncks
return all the shrooms to the pan and add the veg stock
add chopped parsley and any spices at this point
simmer until its reduced by about a 1/3
add the cream
simmer for a bit longer
thicken with cornflour
garnish with a bit more chopped parsley.

Posted: Sat Mar 11, 2006 11:44 am
by craig1459
Cheers Wayland (er where's the chilli?) :D

Posted: Sun Mar 12, 2006 1:29 am
by Wayland2002
Craig

May I draw your attention to

"add chopped parsley and any spices at this point "

this is where you can put the chilli in.

You could always try making butternut squash and chilli soup. Its on my todo list.

Onion soup is quite easy as well. pretty much the same as the mushroom but substitute onion for shroom and dont add the cream.

Posted: Sun Mar 12, 2006 5:52 pm
by Cat
At Christmas I decided to use the chicken carcass to make soup for his nibs (I don't eat meat as I am allergic to some meat proteins...arrrse). I boiled up the remnants of the fowl in all of the wine dregs I could muster, with an onion,a little soya sauce and water until the meat was falling off the bones. I sorted out the meat, strained the stock and added some vegetable leftovers. It smelled so good I tasted it. It tasted like I remember chicken chausseur tasting. (Then I was sick and got spots, as per. One day I'll accept it.) :roll: