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Almond Milk

Posted: Tue Feb 16, 2010 3:02 pm
by bonnacon
Ok, we all know of the popularity of almond milk in mediaeval recipes ! Indeed, I have used it many times when cooking such dishes at home.
However, I have been working recently on converting "domestic"cookbook mediaeval recipes into quantities that can be cooked for 20 or 30 people in the open air at Wood Mark 6. Preparing almond milk under such circumstances is by no means impossible but when disussing whether we could substitute something a little quicker to prepare I began wondering just what specific functions the almond milk had. A certain flavour of course, a bit of oil and therefore good mouth feel, a bit of thickening, conspicuous consumption perhaps, as somewhat richer households would generally only be able to afford almonds in quantity........etc etc.

I'd be interested in anyone's opinions - not what could be substituted, but what specific qualities almond milk brings to any recipe in which it is included.

Re: Almond Milk

Posted: Tue Feb 16, 2010 3:20 pm
by Tamsin Lewis
I've always seen it as a milk substitute during Lent.
Personally I like the flavour, and as I'm dairy intolerant, I've used it in recipes both period and modern for thickening and a creamy flavour..

Re: Almond Milk

Posted: Tue Feb 16, 2010 7:54 pm
by Xioumi
Slightly off-topic but has anyone tried Artisan du Chocolat's non-dairy milk chocolate made with almond milk? It's absolutely divine. If you are dairy intolerant but like milk chocolate you'll love it.

Re: Almond Milk

Posted: Wed Feb 17, 2010 6:35 pm
by James Bretlington
As Tasmin said, a substitute for real milk in Lent. I've not come across it mentioned any other way.

Re: Almond Milk

Posted: Wed Feb 17, 2010 9:12 pm
by Sophia
When I need to prepare large quantities of things such as almond milk and will be cooking outside I have been known to cheat and prepare most of it at home and bring it with in a plastic container and transfer it to a suitable jug on site. Then I do the rest on site for demonstration purposes.

On its use, it was definitely used as a milk substitute for Lent as various people have said above but IIRC there are also non-Lent recipes that involve it, often for Fish Days, which are not represented enough at many re-enactment events. For instance if you are doing an event over the Easter Weekend you should be eating Lenten food on the Friday and Saturday and having a blow out on the Sunday. :D

Re: Almond Milk

Posted: Thu Feb 18, 2010 10:16 pm
by bonnacon
Thanks all :thumbup: After reading the above I'm now thinking about a sweet dish made of thick reduced almond milk with carob powder and a dash of honey added...... :rock:

Re: Almond Milk

Posted: Fri Mar 12, 2010 12:49 pm
by Cat
This may be wayyy wide of the mark, but had you thought of some of the milk substitutes on the market, transferred from carton to suitabule vessel onsite. I'm thinking of the rice-dream, oatly, soya cream type things with a drop of proper almond essence added. The soya cream may split - one risk. I'm sure I've seen a nut-milk somewhere. Hmmmm, a trip to Waitrose may be in order.
(How do you milk a nut anyways?! :wtf: )

Re: Almond Milk

Posted: Fri Mar 12, 2010 1:13 pm
by Gail Horn
With a very small milking machine!

Re: Almond Milk

Posted: Fri Mar 12, 2010 4:01 pm
by Sophia
Cat wrote:This may be wayyy wide of the mark, but had you thought of some of the milk substitutes on the market, transferred from carton to suitabule vessel onsite. I'm thinking of the rice-dream, oatly, soya cream type things with a drop of proper almond essence added. The soya cream may split - one risk. I'm sure I've seen a nut-milk somewhere. Hmmmm, a trip to Waitrose may be in order.
(How do you milk a nut anyways?! :wtf: )


You can get almond milk in some good health food stores but it is very thin and I have not found it good for cooking purposes, this may however be as a result of the dishes I was trying to make. It is always worth giving things a trial run in the kitchen at home to check this sort of thing out.

Re: Almond Milk

Posted: Fri Mar 12, 2010 6:23 pm
by Fairfax
first port of call for anything like this is a good Oriental/Asian super market, if you can find one on the net, ring them, ask them if they have anything like what you are asking, if they haven't they can tell you the next best thing, as quite often their product would be under a different label/name, plus they are very cheap. I managed to get 2kilos of Gallangal for £3.00, Once you are known (for good or bad) they are very obliging,

Re: Almond Milk

Posted: Wed Apr 21, 2010 12:55 pm
by bonnacon
Just an update - amongst an avalanche of assorted dishes at our group's inaugural bash of the season over easter weekend, my partner produced "hens in bruette" with rice. It was almost a mild and creamy chicken curry and the almond milk came through loud and clear, giving a lovely subtle flavour to what I mistakenly thought at first taste was a rather bland dish.
Almond milk - I'm a fan.

Re: Almond Milk

Posted: Sun Apr 25, 2010 8:16 pm
by GreensAndNettles
Almond Milk was a lot more stable than cows milk, which would spoil / sour easily, especially in heat.

Re: Almond Milk

Posted: Mon Apr 26, 2010 4:42 pm
by gregory23b
You make almond milk to order, it is a much longer term proposition to wait for a feeding cow.