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Food in the 18th century

Posted: Tue Aug 25, 2009 3:01 pm
by tonimurray
What were the delicacies in food in the 18th century? Oleo, Pigeons, Sirloin of Beef rost, Venison, Chyne of Mutton, Turkey, Caviar, Snipes, Ducks, Partridge? Does this sound right?

Posted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 9:20 am
by Grymm
How long 'you got?
Quite a few available on google books, go to advance search, click full view, in subject put cookery, in dates 1700 and whatever enddate 1799 or 1820for the long 18thC, click go.

Chocolate is available as an ingredient so choccy mousse,and then there is a world of roasts, collops, cakes, ragoutes(spelled better than I can) cullisisisisisis etc

Posted: Wed Aug 26, 2009 9:57 am
by Cat
Fried celery, Veal escalops with lemon, beetroot pancakes with green apricot preserve, potted meat or fish, potted cheese,anchovy toasts, strawberry fritters (whole strawbs dipped in rich batter by the stalk and deep fried... :D ) syllabubs (both wet and dry) roasts of all sorts, jugged pigeon, salmagundy (sometimes spelled salmangundy), oyster loaves,fish in a pastry coffer, boiled fowl with prune sauce...

This is all from the inside cover page of EH's Georgian Cookery, but I suggest there may be some names here to start you googling!

I want to try the strawberry fritters and the pink pancakes. The fish in pastry works alarmingly well, as does the potted fish flavoured with horseradish and the potted cheese (I coloured it with tomato sauce, nom!).

Posted: Thu Aug 27, 2009 8:34 pm
by Steve of RaT
Goes and finds Hannah Glasse........

Pigeon, veal, beef, tongue and udder, mutton, pork, chicken, duck, pheasant, larks, hare, rabbit, crawfish, red cabbage, hedge-hog, cod, turbot, salmon, eels, sturgeon, crab, lobster, barley pudding, carp, sole, cheesecakes, turtle.

many of the meat is either stewed, jugged, fryed or pie.

Here is an example:

A ragoo of livers.

Take as many livers as you would have for your dish. A turkey liver, and six fowl livers, will make a pretty dish. pick the galls from them, and throw them into cold water; take the six livers, put them into a sauce-pan with a quarter of a pint of gravy, a spoonful of mushrooms, either pickled or fresh, a spoonful of ketchup, a little bit of butter, as big as a nutmeg, rolled in flour, seasoned with pepper and salt to your palate. Let them stew softly ten minutes; in the mean while broil the turkey liver nicely, lay it in the middle, and the stewed livers around; pour the sauce all over, and garnish with lemon.