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Short beer

Posted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 7:41 pm
by LaydeIsabella
A member of one of my groups is after a "fairly aufentik" reciepe for short beer, that'll hopefully turn out at a max of 3%, as the reciepe he tried before was a teeny weeny bit strong and there were sore heads after the sampling.
Any suggestions?? Many thanks.

Posted: Thu Jul 23, 2009 8:06 pm
by Lady Cecily
Small beer is made after the first mash has been sparged by re-mashing the grains to extract any remaining sugars from it, after a second sparging you produce a much lighter wort, and therefore a much lighter beer.

As someone else I know put it - it is the second brew off your tea bag.

So make an authentic beer, then make another or halve the dry goods or use twice a much water. The hydrometer should be about 1030 - it's really like making tea - mash the grains, sparge the wort, test the gravity add water until you reach 1030.

I think small beer may have been a lower gravity than 3%. Until recent years when gravities have gone through the roof 3% is a fairly normal OG.

Short Beer .

Posted: Wed Jul 29, 2009 3:31 pm
by glyndwr 50
I remember being told by a monk somewhere down Devon way that .Short Beer is what they medieval beer makers called small beer ,And was given to children as water was somewhat doggy to drink.It was the last fermenting procces and had a very low alcohol level .The next level up was called Table beer which was equivalent to our normal strengh beer as sold in public houses.the first brew was very strong and way highter than sold today over a pub counter.


Death is nature's way of telling you to slow down..

Posted: Thu Jul 30, 2009 10:40 am
by Sir Thomas Hylton
Lady Cecily wrote:Small beer is made after the first mash has been sparged by re-mashing the grains to extract any remaining sugars from it, after a second sparging you produce a much lighter wort, and therefore a much lighter beer.

As someone else I know put it - it is the second brew off your tea bag.

So make an authentic beer, then make another or halve the dry goods or use twice a much water. The hydrometer should be about 1030 - it's really like making tea - mash the grains, sparge the wort, test the gravity add water until you reach 1030.

I think small beer may have been a lower gravity than 3%. Until recent years when gravities have gone through the roof 3% is a fairly normal OG.
For some reason I now want to put the kettle on & make a nice mug of tea of coffee..... mmmm coffeeeee.

Posted: Thu Jul 30, 2009 12:06 pm
by Lady Cecily
Some folk - especially in the East Riding still 'mash' tea.

Posted: Mon Aug 03, 2009 9:16 pm
by LaydeIsabella
Thanks for that, I'll pass that on ta me mate.

Posted: Mon Aug 10, 2009 5:14 pm
by Langley
Have been chatting up a small brewer (small in terms of quantity, it's not hte Iron Dwarf trying a new line). He is expressing some interest in either letting us have "spent" mash or even trying a brew of two as we explained ht possible market in the season. Will keep you posted. I have made a fantastic small beer by doing a very quick mash. The point is to have a low sugar content as what the yeast gets up to is to convert the sugar to alcohol. If you ever saw the chemistry of all that including how you convert one sort of sugar to another (there are lots, Glucose, sucrose, fructose, maltose etc) some of which are polymers of others you would realise that the yeast is a very clevery little b***r indeed. Anyway, the recipe said it tasted like the smell of fresh bread. Everyone was very sceptical but you know what. It did and served cold at Tutbury it did a fine job of slaking the thirst on a hot day. It required a specialist yeast and a particular type of grain for the mash. Can not remember exactly what now. Will try to dig out the recipe but have not been able to source the ingredients again, not even in the wonderful home brew shop in Bristol. Ferments out in just a few days so is useful for doing demos on events. However, you actually end up throwing away a lot of expensive ingredients to make it quick so not terribly economical for any quantity. That is why we are going to try the alternative!

Posted: Mon Aug 10, 2009 7:33 pm
by Lady Cecily
But a fermeted out brew is not necesarily drinkable - I'd still rather condition it and let it settle and drink a clear brew. Although in theory a second mash will clear quicker because there will be less malt flour swimming around in it.

I have come across a description of Beer being Liquid Bread and Bread as Liquid Beer. The two things are very linked.

I have helped in brewing at an event before and it's not terribly interesting from a viewing publics point of view. Just a large cauldron of bubbling liquid. We also found sparging a 40 pint brew very hard work, it's a heavy amount of liquid to deal with over an open fire, not to mention the weight of the iron cauldron with 3' rims than you need to boil that quantity of water.

Posted: Tue Aug 11, 2009 9:13 am
by Hraefn
Lady Cecily wrote:I have come across a description of Beer being Liquid Bread and Bread as Liquid Beer. The two things are very linked.
nononono they didn't think of beer as food(Tongue in cheek) they only drank it coz the water was kak..........now I'm sure I've heard that round here somewhere...........

Posted: Tue Aug 11, 2009 10:08 am
by Lady Cecily
Hraefn wrote:
Lady Cecily wrote:I have come across a description of Beer being Liquid Bread and Bread as Liquid Beer. The two things are very linked.
nononono they didn't think of beer as food(Tongue in cheek) they only drank it coz the water was kak..........now I'm sure I've heard that round here somewhere...........
Don't get me started on that one. 8)