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Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 12:46 am
by KSBIII
Hi Annis,

I belive adultery is still perceived as being in the mind as much as in the body, "Thou shalt not covert..."

I also believe that priests were encouraged to report occurences of adultery (certainly in the middle ages).

As has been said, the women would be treated more harshly than men. One tretment would include them being forced to do penance bare headed (if not from waist up).

My knowledge on this is however meagre and I stand to be corrected.

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 9:48 am
by Marcus Woodhouse
Knocking the hat off a woman was a public way of denouncing her virtues, whicgh is why hats are still a big thing to wear in Spain, Italy when in Church. The Eucharist is the transformed bread and wine that is used during what Anglicans and other Protestent Churches call the Communion. In the Catholic Church if a Mass is performed by a Deacon rather than an ordained Priest then the Communion is just the issueing of consecreted wafers. In the Catholic and Orthodox churches the belief is that at the point of consecration the bread and wine actually becomes the flesh and blood of Christ, though it retains the outword appearence of bread and wine to make consumption acceptable. This is why meat was forbidden on Feast days.

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 6:14 pm
by Annis
ok thanks!

We've just started to look at religion and gender in more depth in sociology ( i cant believe how sexist religion actually is!)

But yeah, i found an interesting point, not on catholic views on adultery, but a general view towards women, whether its catholic or not is another matter.

Annis x

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 7:35 pm
by guthrie
Annis wrote:ok thanks!
( i cant believe how sexist religion actually is!)
I'm not quite sure how much Tantric counts as a religion, but I believe its pretty fair minded.....
(RUns away before corrupting influence can be spread any further)

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 8:59 pm
by gregory23b
"( i cant believe how sexist religion actually is!) "

Without being too serious about it, that all depends on your PoV, it might be to a modern enlightened western female living in a secular society, it might not be for a victorian woman or medieval woman etc.

Posted: Mon Nov 27, 2006 10:31 pm
by guthrie
gregory23b wrote:"( i cant believe how sexist religion actually is!) "

Without being too serious about it, that all depends on your PoV, it might be to a modern enlightened western female living in a secular society, it might not be for a victorian woman or medieval woman etc.
Exactly. Thats where teh fun really begins, in trying to think like your character, imagine what they would do in certain circumstances, precisely because of specific social pressures or expectations or their previous history.

Posted: Tue Nov 28, 2006 12:44 pm
by Annis
Yay! :lol:

Ok, i suddenly remembered last night that in one of the Philippa Gregory books, The Wise Woman i think, the girl does a Eucharist or something similar, and that is set in Henry's time.
Ok, so PG is not the best and most authentic of books, but Ill have a re-read if i can find it just to get a jist of it.
*mumble mumble* 400 odd pages to go through *mumble mumble*

:D

Posted: Tue Nov 28, 2006 2:43 pm
by Marcus Woodhouse
Women didn't do the Eucharist in the early 1500's it was generally reserved for the clergy, except on special feast days and for the rich if they had a private chaplin. Not that it matters because as Christ becomes present in the Catholic Eucharist it is possible to receive Him in Spirit even if you are unable to physically consume it. This had more to do with the economics of providing enough consecrted Hosts nothing to do with sexisim by the way. It did arise in exsatics running from alter to alter in large cathedrels calling "raise. raise!" in order to just witnessw the magic of "seeing Christ" . Until the last century hardly any of the laity actually recieved the Host in the form of wine, either.