Spiritual connection

Historic questions, thoughts and other interesting stuff

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saxon
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Spiritual connection

Postby saxon » Mon Aug 28, 2006 4:04 pm

On a similar line as to 'what makes you do it' ......... anyone feel a 'spiritual connection' with the particular period they choose to re-enact ? :shock: i.e. does anyone get the feeling that they've trodden that era for real ??!!! :shock:
Anyone feel a certain past connection with a particular property they've re-enacted at ?? i.e. did it feel familiar even though you may never have been there before ??? :shock:



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Postby craig1459 » Mon Aug 28, 2006 9:54 pm

I've got four generations of my family buried in the churchyard at Hales Church which overlooks Blore Heath and my grandmother's ancestors have been in and around that area since the early C18 at least.

When I camped at the Fed training event at Blore in April I awoke in the middle of the night and swear I could hear the sounds of battle. Probably just the wind as the weather was foul and I'd had a bit to drink but spooky at the time nontheless


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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Tue Aug 29, 2006 8:25 am

In my previuos life i was a buddist but in this one i don't believe in reincarnation, that said i find it quite easy to accept and fall into the role of a servant, maybe i just like helping people though or am a naturally sub servient. I generally go to some length to explain why i would not want to live in the 15th century when asked at events as a way of demonstrating how much has moved on, normally starting with well for a start i'm 36 so i would be considered an old man or most likely i would be dead.


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Postby gregory23b » Tue Aug 29, 2006 4:14 pm

No, none at all.

Interested in the activities, yes and the possible associations with the past va certain smells and sensations, but were I to do another period I may well feel the same. I have always liked bows, even as a kid.

"i'm 36 so i would be considered an old man or most likely i would be dead."

Is that because everyone died young in them days?


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Postby m300572 » Tue Aug 29, 2006 4:22 pm

"i'm 36 so i would be considered an old man or most likely i would be dead."

Is that because everyone died young in them days?


No, only the unlucky ones that didn't make it to 36! :lol:



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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Wed Aug 30, 2006 10:32 am

And at most events by Sunday morning I do feel old or even dead.


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Postby m300572 » Wed Aug 30, 2006 10:52 am

And at most events by Sunday morning I do feel old or even dead.


You then make the ideal living history prop - the sleeping soldier! A useful role for the knackered, hungover and the people who have to drive three hundred miles home after the event. It can however lead to a situation I once encountered - hangover victim laid flat out, fast asleep - small Moppet 'Is that a real man?' - cue howls of laughter and (in)appropriate comments from the rest of the group!!



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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Thu Aug 31, 2006 8:20 pm

This not only happened to one of our group at Deventio over the weekend, said MOP then came over and started prodding said "weary soul" to cries of "he awakes Lazarus does awake tis a miracle" from meself who then ran off from startled Mops to spread word of the "sign from God".


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Postby James The Archer » Fri Sep 01, 2006 7:05 pm

At Dartmouth Castle last Bankholiday and I was coming down with the "Cold from Hell" and was having to rest a lot, which with hat over face on me bed in the castle the amount of times I hear is that a real man and I hand to control myself from saying no I was a robot!


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Postby Cat » Wed Sep 06, 2006 9:08 pm

In some sort of sensibule answer to the OP, yes, I have always felt drawn to the later muddyevil period, this is a right since childhood thing and is not the 'textbook' history as much as the day to day life scenario.

Having a father who read voraciously, one of the books I (literally) cut my teeth on was a French account of a medieval boy's life and clothes, with lots of 1970s pictures. Probably explains why two of the words I tried out first were 'liripipe' and 'hoopoe'. (The Observer's book of Birds was another favourite, y'see).

Up to date, now the logical part of me says 'no', however I had quite a moment by John Cheyney's tomb in Salisbury cathedral last week, and was almost moved to tears when the guide taking a touring party around-I wasn't part of the party, but he'd asked me whether I had a special interest in Cheyney, so I talked rinactment at the poor chap- described the moment when they opened the tomb, and found the bones of a tall, well built man inside. Little asides like that, so, Cheyney was tall etc...
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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Mon Sep 11, 2006 10:03 am

Unlike Richard III who just got him in the heart, with a lance.


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Postby WorkMonkey » Mon Sep 11, 2006 10:41 am

Senlac hill did it for me, was grudingly dragged there when I was about 14, much against my will, but once I was there I got this weird sense of "this is where it happened" and tried to imagine the faces and lives of the people who died there, it still holds a special place in my heart and I get a funny feeling whenever i'm near there. Suffice to say it was that event that got me into reading history, and eventually re-enactment.


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Postby Mad Mab » Mon Sep 11, 2006 12:20 pm

I think that anyone born and bred in the angloscottish borders (Northumberland in my case) feels a connection to the times of the Border Reivers, mostly cause attitudes don't seem to have changed that much over the centuries. You find yourself nodding along with historical Border reasoning whilst outsiders stare at you dumbfounded as to how you can think the actions taken are the least bit logical! Borderers are and will always be Borderers. (Which, according to my Dad, translates as bl**dy minded, the lot of them!) :lol:
Having said that, I love Dunstanburgh and Warkworth Castles, there's just something about the atmosphere at each one that grabs me each time. Different reasons but both pull you in. Dunstanburgh's runied and remote on top of a cliff face overlooking the sea and gives such a feeling of isolation and desolation whereas Warkworth is such a part of the town and still feels, well maybe homey is not the right word, but familiar.
There's also a small wood just outside Alnwick that is comprised mostly of Elms. There's very little thick undergrowth, just green swathe and, in the right time of year, bluebells. We used to ride through it at the gallop as part of the Trail rides that our stables did and, I swear, you kept expecting men in green to jump out at you waving longbows! (Course, that could be due to over-exposure to Robin of Sherwood as a child!) :D
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Postby lidimy » Mon Sep 11, 2006 5:13 pm

a few weeks ago i visited hampton court (unfortunately not as an occupant!!) and it was amazing.... i felt about 6 foot off the ground i was so high, i've never felt so elated and overwhelmed in my life. i wanted to laugh and cry and run in circles for a long time.


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Postby Nigonwyrtas » Mon Oct 30, 2006 2:29 am

I'm doing 15thC re-enactment because the other half does it. No spiritual connection with it whatsoever. In fact, everything about it leaves me cold... I was a medievalist at university, but I like the earlier 'medieval' period and better still, Anglo Saxon and Viking periods. A couple of my family names derive from Old Norse names. And I studied Old Norse for 3 years - and took to it like a duck to water. But 15thC? Nope. It's just a load of rich people having a power struggle (yawn). And the women's costume in really boring. Like something from the taliban. I can't relate to the culture of that time, at all.

For years I did 17thC and I felt much more of a connection to that. It was a time of radicalism and ideology - not just fighting for a king, or Lord Nob, but plenty of other stuff doing on, too like the Diggers and Levellers. I loved re-enacting that period, and have done enough genealogy to know I have some sworn parliamentarians amongst my ancestors.

15thC is, for me, possibly the dullest time ever in the history of the world. To imagine any spiritual link with it would be romantic nonsense. But whilst he's doing it, we can't afford to multi-period, so I'm stuck with the yawnsome 15thC for now, sadly.. :lol: Mind you, I'm a practising pagan - have been for years - and the 15thC seems to me to be a very oppressive time, full of christian ideas so it is kind of spiritually reprehensible to me, as a period, too!



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Postby Lindsay » Mon Oct 30, 2006 4:55 am

Seconded! :wink: (I grew up in the Scottish Middle March)

Mad Mab wrote:I think that anyone born and bred in the angloscottish borders (Northumberland in my case) feels a connection to the times of the Border Reivers, mostly cause attitudes don't seem to have changed that much over the centuries. You find yourself nodding along with historical Border reasoning whilst outsiders stare at you dumbfounded as to how you can think the actions taken are the least bit logical! Borderers are and will always be Borderers. (Which, according to my Dad, translates as bl**dy minded, the lot of them!) :lol:


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Postby Alan_F » Mon Oct 30, 2006 12:50 pm

Lindsay wrote:Seconded! :wink: (I grew up in the Scottish Middle March)

Mad Mab wrote:I think that anyone born and bred in the angloscottish borders (Northumberland in my case) feels a connection to the times of the Border Reivers, mostly cause attitudes don't seem to have changed that much over the centuries. You find yourself nodding along with historical Border reasoning whilst outsiders stare at you dumbfounded as to how you can think the actions taken are the least bit logical! Borderers are and will always be Borderers. (Which, according to my Dad, translates as bl**dy minded, the lot of them!) :lol:


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Postby Cat » Mon Oct 30, 2006 2:17 pm

Nygonwyrtas, if you are unhappy with muddyevil, then do a period you do want to do! Why should your O/H get it his own way the whole time? Or come to the dark side and (whispers) cross dress and hit people with sticks. It's a damn sight more fun than wearing a frock. And despite what you may see on here, people don't point and stare if you do. And and it means you get to join in the 'Did you see when I took on all of the Dogs of War by myself...?' conversations in the beer tent afterwards. Sometimes bragging is soooo good!

The violence, is of course the real reason I do it. I should have known better than to have let any romantic ideas get the better of me oh gosh and deary me yes. (Speaketh the ultimate romantic fool.)

And no, Cheyney wasn't got in the heart with a lance, he was the one who picked up the standard after the bearer was snotted dead. Unless I've got it horribly wrong, he lived to become very successful in Henry's court, and was made a knight of the garter and all that jazz.


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Postby Skevmeister » Mon Oct 30, 2006 3:20 pm

Cat

LMFAO, taking on all of the TDOW and one of those cross dresses as well adn I would love too see somebody tell the TQO she had to stay back at camp and do teh washing up !!
I did love Bosworth when you where left by your lot and I chased you for a bit, you with your long pointy stick and me wi just me sword.Also at Tewkers when you said "OI YOU - YOUR TOO NEAR TO THE ROPE" and then noticed I was marshaliing as well. Some good memories for the closed season.

I think that women who want to fight should be able to, and altho' not historically correct when the TQO at Nottingham castle beat the crap out of me eight times over th ewhole pageant weekend the crwod loved to see a woman whacking teh crap out a clanky. Go on have fun and then there'll be more women to stand in the beer tent and say did you see when I walloped that loony who thought he could take a bill block on by himself..........

Wishing you all the best for teh closed season and looking forward to the new season


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Postby gregory23b » Mon Oct 30, 2006 4:27 pm

"15thC is, for me, possibly the dullest time ever in the history of the world."

How so? huge huge changes to the world were happening, the biggest the world had seen, the world was about to become a much bigger place, the established religions challenged and shaken to their core, the world turned upside down, old orders toppled, new ones grown, the rise of the 'middle class', literacy on a wide scale, technology and science, humanism, art (not just for the rich), the modern era was germinating nicely.


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Postby Skevmeister » Mon Oct 30, 2006 4:40 pm

And as long as you stick to the earlier clank period armour was so much more sexy and then just gets proper weird towards the later parts with long steel skirts on the tourney armour....... Wierdness abounds I tell you.

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Postby Cat » Tue Oct 31, 2006 8:51 am

Skev...Tewkesbury... :oops: :D


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Postby Alan_F » Tue Oct 31, 2006 1:30 pm

gregory23b wrote:"15thC is, for me, possibly the dullest time ever in the history of the world."

How so? huge huge changes to the world were happening, the biggest the world had seen, the world was about to become a much bigger place, the established religions challenged and shaken to their core, the world turned upside down, old orders toppled, new ones grown, the rise of the 'middle class', literacy on a wide scale, technology and science, humanism, art (not just for the rich), the modern era was germinating nicely.


And not to forget, the birth of the Renaissance. But I suspect that nigonwyrtas doesn't like hearing about things like this.


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Postby Wilhelm » Tue Oct 31, 2006 3:11 pm

hi all!

I have been viewing this site quite a lot but have never really been able to find anything I could post constructively on!

I have been re-enacting for nearly 4 years now but have been interested in history and medieval history in particular for as long as I can remember and I'm sure I must have 'trodden the path for real' at some point! i certainly do feel some sort of 'spiritual' connection with the 15th century which is my primary area of interest.

[/quote] a few weeks ago i visited hampton court (unfortunately not as an occupant!!) and it was amazing.... i felt about 6 foot off the ground i was so high, i've never felt so elated and overwhelmed in my life

The same happened to me when I visited Careg Cennen castle in south wales (anyone else been there?). The location is absolutely awe inspiring and I certainly felt a direct connection to the past when I was peering through an arrow slit down onto the fog covered fields several hundred feet below. I am sure an archer or whoever, stationed there would have seen much the same thing 600 years ago.[/quote]


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Postby Nigonwyrtas » Sat Nov 04, 2006 12:04 am

I suppose it bores me because I'm not much into reading history books, or anything written 'about' a period - but like reading things written at the time. 15thC gives you nothing of any interest. Anglo Saxon poetry is beautiful, Old Norse too - Middle English also fascinating, but when you're moving out of true 'Middle English', and once you move into that particular century, the literature's doggerel on the whole. Good stuff comes later, of course. But that period flatlines. Ditto the art - interesting before, interesting after - tedious during. These things are subjective, of course - one (wo)man's meat another's poison, etc... Also dislike the costume - feels like sharia law!

Not into pretending to be a man, either. It never looks right and what's the point of even bothering about authenticity in any context if something slightly fundamental - like yer sex - is wrong?

Hopefully, I'll persuade him back to the 17thC at some point. Can't afford to go to two sets of events, though and he's too embroiled in the 15th for now.
:roll:

My spirituality's important to me, and would seriously worry me, spiritually, if I felt any link with that period! :lol: So to get back to the question, no, I can't find any mystical connection with the period I re-enact, frankly I'd be worried if I did. The world's full of folk who think they're a reincarnation of Dick III, as it is. :lol:



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Postby lidimy » Sat Nov 04, 2006 8:05 pm

i agree, any genuine spiritual feeling is something that i dont get, spirituality for me is something i just dont mix with re-enacting and i think the phrase spirituality is abused a bit...

what i do feel is a connection and deep empathy for the people and individuals who lived at that particular time *tudor for me* sometimes if i cant sleep at night i just lay there imagining my life as a tudor.

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Postby Cat » Sat Nov 04, 2006 8:52 pm

...authenticity to me = a human body* out there dressed in the clothes of the time going through the trained motions of their chosen role. Representing. As has been said ad nauseam if one happens to be of the opposing gender but able to disguise ones secondary sexual characteristics enough, go for it.

I'm going to put a few backs up here (ooh goody, a handbagging! They all cried) but as far as I am concerned the female muddyevil role sucks, unless you happen to be a businesswoman or the matriarch of an old landed family- neither of whom would be out on campain.

Horses for courses. horses. Hmm, there's another entirely different can of Dobbins.

So I'm going to carry on being a sojur because I'm a bit good at it and I don't go off crying for me mam too often these days.

*or indeed, Fletch.xxx


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