bardiches, can anyone gave me a history?

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zauberdachs
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bardiches, can anyone gave me a history?

Post by zauberdachs »

hey there. I've been offered a bardiche by one of my mates and I'm tempted to buy but though I've seen them around they look a little...well ... Klingon to be honest.

Can anyone supply an answer if they are:
a. historically accurate
b. if so, to which period
c. who would have used them and would they have appeared on a British battlefield.

any info would be usefull, cheers :)
Do not be loath, diligent reader, to winnow my chaff, and lay up the wheat in the storehouse of your memory. For truth regards not who is the speaker, nor in what manner it is spoken, but that the thing be true - Nennius, 8th century

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Dave B
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Post by Dave B »

PM Roger Langford. He has contemporanious pictures.

Fox is also into this subject
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DomT
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Post by DomT »

Yup. They certainly existed.

Historicaly good for a English battle field? Well When?

They are more of a Eastern European weapon than English so they were probably not that common in England. However there are illustrations of the odd person using them.

They were used 'en mass' as an anti cavalry weapon in the Hussite wars.

SO any middle to late Medeval battlefield might have 'em and in the hands of a Central to Eastern European it's increasaingly likely as a choice compared to say a poleaxe. There were quite a few German and Burgundian mercs floating around in Britian. French support of Welsh and Scots vs the English was often in the form of foreign 'experts'.

I use one in my German mercenary role (but my native persona prefers a GreatSword)
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Post by Chickun »

There's a 15thC (I believe) in the RA in Leeds, they certainly are contemporary. Can't recall seeing them in anything like Beauchamp or suchlike.

Doubt they'd have been common at all in England - As Dom says you may well get the odd one or two floating around the odd continental mercenary - personally don't believe that there were that many mercenaries in England apart from the odd Burgundian handgunner and Scwartz's(sp) lot in 1487 - so therefore if you are looking to portray the "average" as opposed to the extra-ordinary I'd personally say go for a bill, poleaxe perhaps or a spear. Alternatively a glaive would be very acceptable; plenty of illustrations featuring them.
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latheaxe
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Post by latheaxe »

I think the cerated edge types are a later period (i think 15th century)and the type without earlier?.I am sure someone will correct me if i am wrong lol...
zauberdachs...If you decide you dont' want' it,i could be interested lol... :wink:

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zauberdachs
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Post by zauberdachs »

Dave B wrote:PM Roger Langford. He has contemporanious pictures.

Fox is also into this subject


Cheers. I see a Roger Lankford on the membership list, is this the same fella?
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Post by latheaxe »

Yep.. :wink:

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Post by Dave B »

zauberdachs wrote:
Dave B wrote:PM Roger Langford. He has contemporanious pictures.

Fox is also into this subject


Cheers. I see a Roger Lankford on the membership list, is this the same fella?


Sorry, yep, I'm a rubbish speller.
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Post by Nigel »

They were used 'en mass' as an anti cavalry weapon in the Hussite wars.

Hi Domm where did you get this from cannot recall seeing one at tabor and a scan of images of Hussites reveals one which is being carried by an anti Hussite King.

I personally cannot see them in England or Scotland at all
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Post by Alan_F »

Nigel wrote:They were used 'en mass' as an anti cavalry weapon in the Hussite wars.

Hi Domm where did you get this from cannot recall seeing one at tabor and a scan of images of Hussites reveals one which is being carried by an anti Hussite King.

I personally cannot see them in England or Scotland at all


Dom, afraid it's teh same here - references to them in Scotland are drawing a blank - that's not to say that none were used, but it should be noted that Scottish Chroniclers had a habit of noting any exemption from the norm (such as the observance of a man wearing a plaid in 1530).
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Post by zauberdachs »

Alan_F wrote:Dom, afraid it's teh same here - references to them in Scotland are drawing a blank - that's not to say that none were used, but it should be noted that Scottish Chroniclers had a habit of noting any exemption from the norm (such as the observance of a man wearing a plaid in 1530).


Would some one have thought what is basically a big axe worthy of comment? If it was in Scotland I'm sure it would have been classified along with all the lochaber axes and pole axes :) What do you think?
Do not be loath, diligent reader, to winnow my chaff, and lay up the wheat in the storehouse of your memory. For truth regards not who is the speaker, nor in what manner it is spoken, but that the thing be true - Nennius, 8th century

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Post by Alan_F »

zauberdachs wrote:
Alan_F wrote:Dom, afraid it's teh same here - references to them in Scotland are drawing a blank - that's not to say that none were used, but it should be noted that Scottish Chroniclers had a habit of noting any exemption from the norm (such as the observance of a man wearing a plaid in 1530).


Would some one have thought what is basically a big axe worthy of comment? If it was in Scotland I'm sure it would have been classified along with all the lochaber axes and pole axes :) What do you think?


Entirely possible, but then why be so specific as to what arms are being used and miss out on that one?
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Post by Guest »

What sources are you refering to?

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DomT
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Post by DomT »

I shall dig out my references, havent got the books on me.

The only picture I can recall of the top of my head showing them in use in England is in a Osprey, not one of the fancy moderen colour plates but a reproduced bw image from another source. Shows a 14thC English Knight holding one. The image may be a Victorian work of 'inspiration' of course.

As to the eastern use, Again I'll go on a reference hunt although every enclycopedia I have access too shows them as 'Eastern European' in origin.
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Post by craig1459 »

I've got a copy of "Medieval Warfare" - can't recall the writer - with a B/W of Towton. In the foreground are a couple of footsoldiers in the river armed with bardiches. However - this is by a C19 American artist R Cantor Woodville :) so I suspect historical accuracy isn't high on the agenda
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Post by zauberdachs »

Here is a picture in case anyone is interested,

Image
Do not be loath, diligent reader, to winnow my chaff, and lay up the wheat in the storehouse of your memory. For truth regards not who is the speaker, nor in what manner it is spoken, but that the thing be true - Nennius, 8th century

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Post by craig1459 »

The bardiche is a tasty piece of kit - far too tasty for this 'umble billman. Where's me bill'ook?
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