16th Light Dragoons

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Andy R
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16th Light Dragoons

Post by Andy R »

This was the first run out with the new coat.

Still have to add epaulettes.

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Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

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Post by wurzul »

Nice. Good to see caplines doing what God inteneded them to do.

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Post by Sir Thomas Hylton »

Very nice. 8) Though wouldn't call the horse very light :shock:

Not to mention I don't think my eyes have woken up yet as I read Dragons initially.... just as well the mist cleared or I'd hve been really confused.... rofl.

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Post by Andy R »

Sir Thomas Hylton wrote:Very nice. 8) Though wouldn't call the horse very light :shock:

Not to mention I don't think my eyes have woken up yet as I read Dragons initially.... just as well the mist cleared or I'd hve been really confused.... rofl.
What horse?

That's a pony would you credit it - just a little oversize.
(but yes, he does take the leg up well)
Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

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Post by Sir Thomas Hylton »

Andy R wrote:
Sir Thomas Hylton wrote:Very nice. 8) Though wouldn't call the horse very light :shock:

Not to mention I don't think my eyes have woken up yet as I read Dragons initially.... just as well the mist cleared or I'd hve been really confused.... rofl.
What horse?

That's a pony would you credit it - just a little oversize.
(but yes, he does take the leg up well)
Sorry thought it was a miniture shire/dray. Either way heavey even for a Pony

I'll go wander off & play a guitar...rofl.

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Post by Andy R »

He's a Dales/Irish Cob cross
Size of horses for the 10th Lights in 1813 for example...

16 Hands - 4 Horses
15.2 Hands - 74 Horses
15 Hands - 138 Horses
14.2 Hands - 83 Horses

299 Horses

A comparison with those of the Scots Greys shows that the majority of the latter were 15 hands with an equally large proportion being 15h2. A similar comparison with the age of the horses confirms that a majority were 5 years old.

The Inspecting General found that the horse of the 10th were of good appearance and well nourished, although nine horses were found to be unfit for service.
If Josh was an army horse, he would be hogged and docked.
Having seen him hogged it changes his appearence greatly, and he looks every bit the hunter (with short fat hairy legs)
Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

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Post by Phil the Grips »

and he's lovely and I want him (the horse, not Andy...)
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Post by Sir Thomas Hylton »

Certainly ls sturdy. Looks full of character too. Can see on at least one level why you might like him 8)

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Post by Phil the Grips »

Sir Thomas Hylton wrote:Certainly ls sturdy. Looks full of character too. Can see on at least one level why you might like him 8)
Yep that's Andy to a tee. The horse is the same ;)
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Post by Sir Thomas Hylton »

:lol: :roll: :D

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Post by Andy R »

Well Phill, as ever, you are welcome to ride out with me if you are ever down our way.

Josh is a good lad, and he was much loved by the children down at Hangleton. Although he was less keen on the drums and flags...!!
Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

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Post by steve stanley »

Much more soldier-like than that posey Hussar stuff........... :)
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Send me up in Grand River
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Post by lidimy »

I love it! The bridle makes him look very workmanlike...

Andy, 5 years is quite young for a horse isn't it? weren't they broken in later then than now? (thinking of Black Beauty at 4... whereas I though 3 y/o was normal for horses now?) presumably they would be trained from the outset to a military style life but how many horses, after experiencing one battle, would go 'willingly' into their second (assuming they weren't injured?)
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Post by Andy R »

lidimy wrote:I love it! The bridle makes him look very workmanlike...

Andy, 5 years is quite young for a horse isn't it? weren't they broken in later then than now? (thinking of Black Beauty at 4... whereas I though 3 y/o was normal for horses now?) presumably they would be trained from the outset to a military style life but how many horses, after experiencing one battle, would go 'willingly' into their second (assuming they weren't injured?)
A re-enactor talking about taking horses to events said on another forum "they never took untrained horses to a battle, so why do we think we should be able to get away withh it"

Aftyer reading Tomkinson's letters, he was shot three times and bayoneted once during his first battle after his horse bolted. The horses they received were fresh, and they received their training on the march.

I can recommend Tomkinson's memoirs as a damned fine read
Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

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Post by Andy R »

steve stanley wrote:Much more soldier-like than that posey Hussar stuff........... :)
Steve
Damned straight.

When looking at new units I decided to steer clear of hussars for that reason.

The 15th used to be the only Hussar unit (and in fairness, they are the only one to do campaign, or even authentic turn out).

The 10th are the only Hussar regiment not re-created, and currently we are the only Light Dragoon unit.

The Hussar Brigade sat out of the war for just over half of it (1808 to 1813) where as the 12th, 13th, and 16th Lights fought all the way through the war.

I liked the idea of the 20th, as you have the 15th (Kings Own), 16th (Queens Own), 12th (Prince of Wales Own), 18th (kings Own Irish) and 7th (Queens Own) where as the poor old 20th took the monica "Nobody's Own"
Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

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Post by lidimy »

Andy R wrote:
lidimy wrote:I love it! The bridle makes him look very workmanlike...

Andy, 5 years is quite young for a horse isn't it? weren't they broken in later then than now? (thinking of Black Beauty at 4... whereas I though 3 y/o was normal for horses now?) presumably they would be trained from the outset to a military style life but how many horses, after experiencing one battle, would go 'willingly' into their second (assuming they weren't injured?)
A re-enactor talking about taking horses to events said on another forum "they never took untrained horses to a battle, so why do we think we should be able to get away withh it"

Aftyer reading Tomkinson's letters, he was shot three times and bayoneted once during his first battle after his horse bolted. The horses they received were fresh, and they received their training on the march.

I can recommend Tomkinson's memoirs as a damned fine read
Harsh life for a horse.... so it was rare to take the same horse into battle twice?
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Post by Andy R »

lidimy wrote:I love it! The bridle makes him look very workmanlike...
Here's a pucker 1812 pattern. Mine is an 1805 hussar bridle (with modifications)
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1812 bridle
1812 bridle
Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

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Post by Andy R »

lidimy wrote:
Andy R wrote:
Harsh life for a horse.... so it was rare to take the same horse into battle twice?
Once they were desensitised they seem to have gotten on okay.

After being injured in 1809, Tomkinson went through the rest of the war unscathed.

In the letters horse injuries seem to be rare.

Also the battle returns list number of horses wounded or killed, and unless they were particularly stupid (we are talking British cavalry) the figurs weren't too high.
Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

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Post by lidimy »

The tack cleaning looks like it would be fun :twisted:

It makes such a difference to ride with the appropriately kitted horse.... looks kinda crummy when the rider makes an effort but the horse doesnt ( :lol: !) for your period is it a requirement to have appropriate tack if you opt for a horsey role?

That surprises me about the few horse casualties. I thought it was practice to remove the horse to render the rider more vulnerable?
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Post by Andy R »

lidimy wrote:The tack cleaning looks like it would be fun :twisted:

It makes such a difference to ride with the appropriately kitted horse.... looks kinda crummy when the rider makes an effort but the horse doesnt ( :lol: !) for your period is it a requirement to have appropriate tack if you opt for a horsey role?

That surprises me about the few horse casualties. I thought it was practice to remove the horse to render the rider more vulnerable?
Tack cleaning is never fun

The idea is to acquire the appropriate tack over time. It all costs money, and after 11 years I only just managed to get a set of holsters.

Yes, if you can;t hit the rider, hit the horse.

But....

Period sword drill has more defensive postures than offensive cuts, plus there was a considerable bounty for captured horses.

If they couldn't make off with them, they did hamstring them though it has to be said.
Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

http://www.16ld.org

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Post by lidimy »

I can imagine it would cost a lot!

Thanks for sharing your knowledge - much appreciated :D
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Post by Darkmere »

Nice Pic's
Hope you doint mind but I was at a loose end and made one of them a bit clearer

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The Dogs of War

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Post by Andy R »

Shiny...!


Cheers,
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Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

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Post by steve stanley »

So nice I've quite forgiven you for it not being the 1777 outfit I thought of when I saw the title.......
Steve
"Give me a tent and a kettle
Snowshoes and axe and gun
Send me up in Grand River
Steering by star and sun".
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Post by Andy R »

steve stanley wrote:So nice I've quite forgiven you for it not being the 1777 outfit I thought of when I saw the title.......
Steve
maybe later :D

They wore Tarletons, and I do love a good Tarleton.
Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

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Post by steve stanley »

Must admit,aforesaid helmet,green jacket & some hapless militia to ride down could tempt me......... :)
"Give me a tent and a kettle
Snowshoes and axe and gun
Send me up in Grand River
Steering by star and sun".
- Labrador Trapper's Song

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Post by Andy R »

steve stanley wrote:Must admit,aforesaid helmet,green jacket & some hapless militia to ride down could tempt me......... :)
16th circa 1779
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Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

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Post by steve stanley »

I think the dismounted troop wins a prize for obscure units........
"Give me a tent and a kettle
Snowshoes and axe and gun
Send me up in Grand River
Steering by star and sun".
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Post by Andy R »

They fought mounted and dismounted, but the Tarleton seems to have replaced the regular pattern helmet in the 16th.

The 17th by stark contrast kept their's till the end despite moves to the contrary (likewise with the green jackets)
Young men have often been ruined through owning horses, or through backing them, but never through riding them: unless of course they break their necks, which, taken at a gallop, is a very good death to die

http://www.16ld.org

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