18th century street life

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Bucket
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Re: 18th century street life

Postby Bucket » Thu May 24, 2012 11:20 am

So you need to turn up then....
btw would you like me to bring kitguide for the Minutmen to Weymouth smuggling event as i understand you'll be attending said event?



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cannontickler
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Re: 18th century street life

Postby cannontickler » Thu May 24, 2012 6:42 pm

Bucket wrote:So you need to turn up then....
btw would you like me to bring kitguide for the Minutmen to Weymouth smuggling event as i understand you'll be attending said event?


who grassed me up, it was supposed to be a surprise, was going to merge into the masses in my mid 18th Naval kit and look all native like.

Pahh, when have i ever got the correct kit for the correct venue, besides, i've flogged off some of my colonial militiaman kit over winter thinking i would no longer need it, i do still however have nice kit that looks a lot like this though.........


Image

hang on though, you mad persons and fools haven't decided to make some seriously stupid move such as attempting to regiment a minuteman uniform of some kind have you.......!?!?!??!.....you KNOW that would just end in tears, i seem to remember it going totally tits at the mere thought of trying to get just a couple of people in a regimented uniform before :doh:


it was a quick process until they made it efficient .

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Bucket
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Re: 18th century street life

Postby Bucket » Fri May 25, 2012 10:34 am

Nah were not getting regimentally in any way, just the militia gear of 1770's is different from the 1750's. Civilian clothing styles have changed.
So if you've got kit like the photo, does that mean your going to appear very flat and 2 dimensional on us?!?! In seriousness, if you have clothing that looks like the photo then it should do fine, there's going to be 5 of us lexington types at weymouth, including our glorious Sargent Brett Fletcher, so we can have a good ole catchup.



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cannontickler
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Re: 18th century street life

Postby cannontickler » Fri May 25, 2012 5:25 pm

Bucket wrote:Nah were not getting regimentally in any way, just the militia gear of 1770's is different from the 1750's. Civilian clothing styles have changed.
So if you've got kit like the photo, does that mean your going to appear very flat and 2 dimensional on us?!?! In seriousness, if you have clothing that looks like the photo then it should do fine, there's going to be 5 of us lexington types at weymouth, including our glorious Sargent Brett Fletcher, so we can have a good ole catchup.



Hello mate, yeah just messing, my colonial militia kit is exact for period and i've got the other gear.
( until i flog the the gun that is .Ha, Ha, Ha. )
with a bit of luck a certain other very clever person should be at weymouth and we can reveal the secret item of lust,
actually i've not seen it meself yet, so touch wood he makes it so i can see whats what.
yeah lets do some cardboard cut outs of the images and have them as the back ranks, nobody will ever know the difference between them and Steve
:lol:


it was a quick process until they made it efficient .

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Bucket
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Re: 18th century street life

Postby Bucket » Fri May 25, 2012 7:44 pm

sounds like a plan. btw i look forward to seeing you surprise



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cannontickler
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Re: 18th century street life

Postby cannontickler » Sat May 26, 2012 8:24 am

oooh, suit you sir..........

Commodore the Honourable Augustus Keppel

Image

A three-quarter-length portrait slightly to left facing to right in captain's (over three years) undress uniform, 1748-67. This uniform was introduced in 1748 immediately before the portrait was painted. His right hand is thrust into his waistcoat and he wears a hat and his own hair. In the left background is a rock face with foliage and on the right the ships of his squadron are shown together with the 'Centurion', 54 guns, flying his commodore's broad pendant. Keppel, the second son of the Earl of Albemarle, was one of a powerful Whig family of Dutch origin, who came to England with William III. In 1740 he served under Commodore Anson in the 'Centurion' on his four-year voyage round the world. This portrait was probably painted at Port Mahon, Minorca, during August and December 1749 when Reynolds had accompanied Keppel to the Mediterranean on a mission to negotiate against the depredations of Barbary corsairs. Lord Edgcumbe had introduced Reynolds to Keppel in early 1749 and on 11 May the painter sailed with him (again in the 'Centurion') from Plymouth for Minorca. He spent the rest of the year there, painting portraits of the British garrison. In January 1750 he set off independently for Italy, where he stayed for two years to travel and study. This was the first of many portraits of Keppel painted by Reynolds and marked the beginning of a close lifelong friendship between them. In 1758 Keppel commanded a small expedition, which captured the island fortress of Goree, off Dakar on the West African coast. At the Battle of Quiberon Bay, 20 November 1759, he commanded the 'Torbay', 74 guns, and played a notable part by sinking the French 'Thesée', 74 guns. In 1761 he commanded the naval forces at the capture of Belle Ile and in the following year was second-in-command to Sir George Pocock at the capture of Havana. During this time he became a rear-admiral. On this expedition his elder brother, Lord Albemarle, was Commander-in-Chief and another brother was a general officer on his staff. Keppel commanded the Channel fleet in the early years of the American War of Independence, 1775-83, but found the fleet unprepared. On 27 July 1778 in the 'Victory', 100 guns, he led the fleet in an indecisive battle with the French off Ushant. His second-in-command, Sir Hugh Palliser, gave him inadequate support and the resulting quarrel split the Navy. Keppel, a Whig, was tried by court-martial, at which Palliser, a Tory, conducted the prosecution. When Keppel was acquitted he became the hero of the hour but the whole affair was politically charged. Keppel retired from active service, entered Parliament as MP for Surrey, and became a Viscount in 1782. In 1740 Reynolds was apprenticed to the portrait painter Thomas Hudson (1701-90) and began portrait work in his native Devon. In 1753, on his return from Italy, he set up in London and rapidly began to make a name as portrait painter, profoundly influenced by his time in Italy. He became the first President of the Royal Academy in 1768 and was knighted in 1769. He was the most influential figure of the century in elevating British painting and portraiture. Reynolds borrowed poses from the old masters and by 1759 he had created social portraits in a new style that were deemed fresh and modern, and yet dignified the status of the sitter. The portrait is inscribed 'The Honourable Commodore Augustus Keppel', and signed and dated 'Josh Reynolds 1749'.


it was a quick process until they made it efficient .

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cannontickler
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Re: 18th century street life

Postby cannontickler » Sat May 26, 2012 8:29 am

bit of a weedy pic, but if you copy it in and zoom its got some amazing detail.

A View of the Landing (of) the New England Forces in yee Expedition against Cape Breton, 1745"
Image


it was a quick process until they made it efficient .

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cannontickler
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Re: 18th century street life

Postby cannontickler » Sat May 26, 2012 6:51 pm

Carpenters hall Philadelphia

Image
An awning shades the Tavern's entrance in this 18th-century print. At right is the Bank of Pennsylvania which rented Carpenters' Hall while this imposing structure was underway

If ever a building embodied the spirit of a city, the City Tavern did just that in the closing quarter of the 18th century. Through its doorway, crowned with a decorative fanlight, came all the great men — and some notable women — of colonial America. Martha Washington and Abigail Adams stayed there with their husbands. The glamorous Peggy Shippen, who later abetted the treachery of her husband, Benedict Arnold, probably graced the bi-weekly "dancing assemblies."

From its construction in 1773 until the federal government moved to the new capital in 1800, the City Tavern witnessed more pivotal events in the nation's history than any structure in British North America, except for the State House itself.

http://www.ushistory.org/carpentershall ... /feast.htm


it was a quick process until they made it efficient .


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