Decorated musket stocks

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Martin
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Decorated musket stocks

Post by Martin »

Just picked up my (first :twisted: ) musket, its a Charleville 1777 and Im going to use it for the trapper / Lewis and Clark demos I do, Ive always tarted up any weapons I get, painted shafts on spears / bills etc I want to find images of decorated musket stocks, do any excist ? Im thinking about doing a bit of pyrography (sp?) and also something using buckskin and feathers lol, I figure if I was traipsing through the woods / mountains etc I would decorate my weapon when bored , sitting around the fire etc, where would one find any such images ? :) Im very very close to persuading Suzie she needs a Kentucky long rifle :twisted: , also tryin g to find some info on the air gun that Lewis and Clark had on the expedition :)
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tabor
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Re: Decorated musket stocks

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John Waller
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Re: Decorated musket stocks

Post by John Waller »

The most common decoration on trade muskets would seem to be patterns of brass nails in the stock. I think I have some pics at home, will have a look for you.
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Joolz
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Re: Decorated musket stocks

Post by Joolz »

Martin,

You could do a lot worse than spend the next few hours of your life going through this resource:

http://contemporarymakers.blogspot.com/

You'll find contemporary decoration of every description, as well as loads of very, very pretty toys......

Joolz
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Martin
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Re: Decorated musket stocks

Post by Martin »

cheers chaps :)
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steve stanley
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Re: Decorated musket stocks

Post by steve stanley »

I've also got refererences to painted stocks for native use..........
"Give me a tent and a kettle
Snowshoes and axe and gun
Send me up in Grand River
Steering by star and sun".
- Labrador Trapper's Song

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Martin
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Re: Decorated musket stocks

Post by Martin »

oooooh could you post me a link please :)
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steve stanley
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Re: Decorated musket stocks

Post by steve stanley »

Sorry,old-fashioned books & chats with people in the States.....Blue or Red as I recall......1780's,so it'd be woodlands stuff
"Give me a tent and a kettle
Snowshoes and axe and gun
Send me up in Grand River
Steering by star and sun".
- Labrador Trapper's Song

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Joolz
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Re: Decorated musket stocks

Post by Joolz »

Martin,

For info on painted gunstocks, go to

http://frontierfolk.net/phpBB/index.php

Using the Search function at the top of the page, search for - painted stock - you will find lots, and lots, and lots of topics covering every facet of this, from red stocks, to blue stocks, to white stocks, to spotted stocks, to floral painted stocks, to woodgrain painted stocks etc. etc. etc.

It seems variety was the order of the day in the 18thC.

Enjoy,

Joolz
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cannontickler
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Re: Decorated musket stocks

Post by cannontickler »

Martin wrote:Just picked up my (first :twisted: ) musket, its a Charleville 1777 and Im going to use it for the trapper / Lewis and Clark demos I do, Ive always tarted up any weapons I get, painted shafts on spears / bills etc I want to find images of decorated musket stocks, do any excist ? Im thinking about doing a bit of pyrography (sp?) and also something using buckskin and feathers lol, I figure if I was traipsing through the woods / mountains etc I would decorate my weapon when bored , sitting around the fire etc, where would one find any such images ? :) Im very very close to persuading Suzie she needs a Kentucky long rifle :twisted: , also tryin g to find some info on the air gun that Lewis and Clark had on the expedition :)

info on the Lewis and Clark airgun.....................

Lewis and Clark's Air Rifle

When Lewis and Clark headed up the Missouri River with the Corp of Discovery in 1803, they became the best armed war party in the American West. One gun they took with them was an air gun. This airgun had an air tank in its stock, which would be pressurized for a number of shots. The rifle shot a lead ball just like the flintlock rifles the party carried, of .463 caliber, according to Dr. Beeman.

Image

Photos from Vintage Airguns, thanks to Mr. Peter Nolan. Many people believe the Lewis and Clark air gun was a Girandoni airgun, with Peter's Girandoni visible here. The stock would be removed from the rifle, and be pumped with a LARGE number of strokes to pressurize the tank, and the stock could then be reattached to the rifle. Spare stocks would be carried which could each be fully charged. The air gun was a repeater, and would shoot multiple rounds before the balls and air had to be replenished. It had the external appearance of a typical flintlock, but the stock was more rounded.

This air rifle became a centerpiece in the Captains' dog and pony show, and was fired at every meeting and pow wow with the Indian tribes met along the way. The intent was to impress on the Indians the great technology held by the Americans, and to thus foster cooperation. The gun was demonstrated in a way that hid the technology of the gun, with the Indians deliberately left with the impression that it was powered by magic.

MUCH more information on air guns is to be found at the Henry Stuart Antique Firearms site, of the VMI Museum.

The gun was described in the journal of a traveler (Thomas Rodney) on the Ohio river who met Lewis, and saw it demonstrated.

“Visited Captain Lewess barge. He shewed us his air gun which fired 22 times at one charge. He shewed us the mode of charging her and then loaded with 12 balls which he intended to fire one at a time; but she by some means lost the whole charge of air at the first fire. He charged her again and then she fired twice. He then found the cause and in some measure prevented the airs escaping, and then she fired seven times; but when in perfect order she fires 22 times in a minute. All the balls are put at once into a short side barrel and are then droped into the chamber of the gun one at a time by moving a spring; and when the triger is pulled just so much air escapes out of the air bag which forms the britch of the gun as serves for one ball. It is a curious peice of workmanship not easily discribed and therefore I omit attempting it.”

Animated views of the firearm and and its firing (three seperate animations) are to be found at the Animations page of the Discovering Lewis and Clark site, along with much more information about the Core of Discovery.

The air gun was described as being "of the Girandoni type", referring to an Austrian maker of similar air guns, although some believe that it was a Girandoni, sold by a U.S. dealer. More information and illustrations on the Lewis air gun and Girandoni type air guns are on the site of Robert D. Beeman PhD.
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Earl Mortimer
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Re: Decorated musket stocks

Post by Earl Mortimer »

Very interesting. Enjoyed reading this thread so far :)
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