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What's a good 17th century surname?

Posted: Tue Oct 01, 2013 11:06 pm
by Henri De Ceredigion
I am writing my own version of the Musketeer stories and am making good progress but have come to a grinding halt on the issue of surnames, specifically a suitable 17th century surname for the Duke of Buckingham's butler and was hoping that I might get some ideas from members?

Re: What's a good 17th century surname?

Posted: Tue Oct 01, 2013 11:58 pm
by Mike Garrett
Willikins

Re: What's a good 17th century surname?

Posted: Wed Oct 02, 2013 8:58 am
by Medicus Matt
The vast majority of English surnames that' are in use today?

Forenames change with fashion, surnames....not so much.

Re: What's a good 17th century surname?

Posted: Wed Oct 02, 2013 10:15 am
by Phil the Grips
"Smith" is a pretty sure bet from the Iron Age onwards

Re: What's a good 17th century surname?

Posted: Tue Oct 29, 2013 10:21 am
by Mark Griffin
Stuart has a nice ring to it. And as servants often took the surnames of their masters, your choice is a wide one.

Re: What's a good 17th century surname?

Posted: Fri Dec 06, 2013 10:47 am
by Lord High Everything Esle
My favourite 17thC name is "Praise Be To God Barebones", after who the Barbones parliament is named.

Ben Johnson has some good forenames in "the Alchemist"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Alchemist_(play)

Re: What's a good 17th century surname?

Posted: Fri Dec 06, 2013 1:55 pm
by Sasha
Several real names here taken from a muster roll.

http://www.traynedbandes.org.uk/content.php?content=men

Re: What's a good 17th century surname?

Posted: Fri Jan 29, 2016 8:00 pm
by Strafford
Cromwell was quite successful. Stuart was a no no.

Re: What's a good 17th century surname?

Posted: Sat Jan 30, 2016 12:45 am
by de Coverley
Fletcher, Carver, Butcher, Smith, Forester -trades of the period. John Playford, Mr Cosgill, Mr Beveridge, Miss Sayer
Farrier, Currier, Brewer. Seriously up market names may still hark back to the French/Norman De Beer, De Burgh. Add a smattering of Dutch influence especially in East Anglia

Don't know what they were but Nottingham has Warser Gate and Pilcher Gate, the Gate coming from the Danish Gade meaning way but what were the names from? Trades?