Brrrr it's a bit cold out there...

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Bevis Gittens
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Brrrr it's a bit cold out there...

Post by Bevis Gittens »

As the majority of the UK is currently under a blanket of snow, I thought it might be appropriate to ask if people can quote sources for cold weather gear in the period? As the re-enactment season is usually over the summer I have not really looked much into cold weather clothing. I know that wools such as Frieze and Rugg would be used to make thick coats and gowns, but were scarfs, gloves (knitted or material?) commonly worn? I remember reading about Gustavus Adolphus, later in 1632, wearing two shirts to keep warm at the Battle of Lutzen.

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Christabel
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Re: Brrrr it's a bit cold out there...

Post by Christabel »

The Museum of London has a Tudor child's knitted vest, mittens and cap in their collection.

I went on a red herring hunt trying to find out what a gaberdine was - as Caliban dives underneath his in The Tempest I wondered if it might be waterproof. But it seems that it was a long belted garment which became associated with Jews in the 16th century (Shylock refers to his) and I suppose was worn by Caliban as a low-ranking outsider figure. (No offence intended - it's the Elizabethan slant.) So that scuppered my hopes as to finding out what people wore in the wet. I know women had guards on their skirts to keep mud off when riding horses, but cloaks must have been coated with lanolin or something, surely, to repell water?
Good luck with your cold-weather gear hunt.

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Bevis Gittens
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Re: Brrrr it's a bit cold out there...

Post by Bevis Gittens »

Heavy felted frieze and rugg is surprisingly water proof wool. It takes a long time from the wet to penetrate. Same with my felted Monmouth Cap; I have been caught in the heaviest downpours where I have got soaked to the skin but my head was bone dry... though my hat weighted twice as much and took a a long time to dry out!

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Bevis Gittens
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Re: Brrrr it's a bit cold out there...

Post by Bevis Gittens »

These are slightly later (early 17th century) but some great pictures by the Dutch artist Avercamp showing winter scenes on National Gallery's site (chance to magnify and look really close at pics too)

http://www.nationalgallery.org.uk/artis ... k-avercamp

Lots of cloaks and coats, and one chap (who looks like a sailor) wearing what appears to be mittens (Bottom centre of 'A Scene on the Ice near a Town' leaning on a post). I know it is thin ice (sorry) to rely on paintings too much: artist bias, imagination etc - with a 21st century eye it is easy to think it is somehow photographic rather than created from an artists mind...... still worth studying and nice to look at too :)

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Karen Larsdatter
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Re: Brrrr it's a bit cold out there...

Post by Karen Larsdatter »

You'll find several gloves at http://larsdatter.com/gloves.htm of course.

But here's some other linkspages for a more fun look at cold-weather gear in this period:
http://larsdatter.com/sleighs.htm
http://larsdatter.com/sleds.htm
http://larsdatter.com/ice-skates.htm
http://larsdatter.com/snowballs.htm

(Snow out here is around 34" deep, not counting snowdrifts. More is expected on Monday. This much snow is very unusual for this area, generally speaking, but on the other hand, it's been kind of nice to stay home and do canvaswork when my office is closed due to the weather.)

Lady Cecily
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Re: Brrrr it's a bit cold out there...

Post by Lady Cecily »

You can leave the lanolin in wool and still weave and knit with it. My mum used to make jumpers with unwashed wool and they were fantastically waterproof. You just had to get used to the fact you couldn't wash it. I seem to recall the Black Welsh jumper was the best out of the many she made.
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Re: Brrrr it's a bit cold out there...

Post by Foxe »

Clothing provided for sailors on an East India Company voyage to hunt for the North West Passage in 1602 consisted of:

Leather breeches lined with lambskin
Leather cassocks lined with lambskin
Leather hoods lined with lambskin
Leather gowns lined with frieze
Mittens lined with lambskin
Socks
Hamburgh linen shirts
Waistcoats of Welsh cotton
'Woodmar' boot hose
Neats leather shoes and boots
Pettycoats
Doublets
...and further this Informant saith not.

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Dathi
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Re: Brrrr it's a bit cold out there...

Post by Dathi »

I'd forgotten this one....

The attack on Leeds in January 1643 by Sir Thomas Fairfax has some interesting pointers to weather conditions and just how hard these b'terds were.

The Parliamentarian forces under Fairfax formed up on the moors overlooking Leeds on the road from Wakefield but were forced to move down the hill into more sheltered areas because of the snow storm and wind that had blown up.

ONn of his men was shot but uninjured during the attack as the bullet penerated the soldier's coat, jerkin, doublet, waistcoat and 2 shirts and just burnt him.

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Bevis Gittens
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Re: Brrrr it's a bit cold out there...

Post by Bevis Gittens »

Dathi wrote: ONn of his men was shot but uninjured during the attack as the bullet penerated the soldier's coat, jerkin, doublet, waistcoat and 2 shirts and just burnt him.
He must have looked like a Michelin man with that many layers. :D
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