Battlefield Medicine

Moderator: Moderators

Phoenix Rising
Posts: 223
Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2011 8:58 pm

Battlefield Medicine

Postby Phoenix Rising » Thu Jun 07, 2012 11:08 pm

Been looking for some ideas to widen both my own knowledge and to enhance my archer persona, and been trying to find out a bit about the sort of treatment that would have been available for battlefield wounds / injuries in the era, specifically 1300 / 1400. I've found references to barbour surgeons etc, but there seems to be more on general medical curatives than on specific wound injuries. Believe that rudimentry bone setting and stitching was done, for example, but was there any sort of herbal anesthetic used to deaden the pain?

Or was it a large clout over the head with a sword pommel... :crazy:

Can anyone give me some basic ideas or point me in the right direction? Any help much appreciated!



User avatar
Bittersweet
Posts: 255
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:54 am

Re: Battlefield Medicine

Postby Bittersweet » Fri Jun 08, 2012 8:52 am

search.php

You could start with these, might lead you to what you're looking for.


Why can't life be simple?


Marcus Woodhouse
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 3337
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:35 pm

Re: Battlefield Medicine

Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Sat Jun 09, 2012 11:59 am

I cannot be the only soldier in history that has found copious amounts of booze to have helped me to cope with pain!


OSTENDE MIHI PECUNIAM!

Phoenix Rising
Posts: 223
Joined: Sun Aug 21, 2011 8:58 pm

Re: Battlefield Medicine

Postby Phoenix Rising » Sat Jun 09, 2012 6:11 pm

Cheers for the replies to this one guys - had a look at the book Brother Kevfael mentions, and should be on its way to me from Amazon as I write this! Has also led me dowsn some paths for research that I hadn't thought of, both from this and from searching this site as Bittersweet suggested. Seems like the use of cobwebs was a pretty common one for wound healing (binnding them into the wound seemed to help stop bleeding as well). Was surprised to find an article on the net that even had people in the late 1900's using this in some villages in rural England!

But agree with Marcus...booze, booze, and a bit more booze...and then perhaps give some to your 'patient'! :drunk:



User avatar
Bittersweet
Posts: 255
Joined: Sat Jun 17, 2006 11:54 am

Re: Battlefield Medicine

Postby Bittersweet » Sun Jun 10, 2012 6:21 am

Maybe that's why mead is so popular because it combines the two essential properties for healing...honey, I understand, has antiseptic/healing properties and having it turned into alcohol has the anaesthetic properties :D


Why can't life be simple?

User avatar
Brian la Zouche
Posts: 426
Joined: Sat Jul 03, 2010 6:07 am
Location: Ashby dela Zouch, Leics
Contact:

Re: Battlefield Medicine

Postby Brian la Zouche » Sun Jun 10, 2012 8:57 am

[quote="Marcus Woodhouse"]I cannot be the only soldier in history that has found copious amounts of booze to have helped me to cope with pain![/quote]

and continues to do so today :thumbup:



User avatar
Tiddles
Posts: 168
Joined: Thu Sep 09, 2010 9:54 am
Location: Wallingford near Oxford
Contact:

Re: Battlefield Medicine

Postby Tiddles » Fri Jun 22, 2012 1:14 pm

I have been thinking along a similar subject.

And was wondering if there was a medieval equivalent to the modern day battle field medic?



User avatar
Sir_John_Thomas
Posts: 136
Joined: Fri Sep 26, 2008 6:16 pm
Location: Boston, in the Shire of Lincoln

Re: Battlefield Medicine

Postby Sir_John_Thomas » Fri Jun 22, 2012 5:50 pm

I suppose that the barber surgeons travelling with the army would have their assistants wander around in the rear of the battle line looking for the wounded. If the wounded looked like they could be saved (dead ones can't pay the bill), then basic first aid is applied, and then they would be carried to the barber surgeon's wagon/tent/awning for treatment

That's my thought, it's what I would do if I was a barber looking for trade.


"God said love thy neighbour as untoo thy self, unless they are Turkish, in which case, KILL THE B**TARDS!"

Richard IV before leaving on crusade

http://community.lincolnshire.gov.uk/Th ... fSkirbeck/

Marcus Woodhouse
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 3337
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:35 pm

Re: Battlefield Medicine

Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Sat Jun 23, 2012 8:14 pm

They were common in mercenary companies in Italy. Considered a good way foa phsycicia to pick up skills quickly.


OSTENDE MIHI PECUNIAM!


Return to “1100-1500”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests