Mad people with handgonnes

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James The Archer
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Re: Mad people with handgonnes

Post by James The Archer »

As FED master gunner, at a FED event, words would be said
Duck the arrows are coming!

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kayleaeloise
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Re: Mad people with handgonnes

Post by kayleaeloise »

well i would hope that in the event that i became lax about gunning ( i seriously hope not but as has been said people can become complacent) that someone would give me a swift kick up the *rse (well mabye not literally) :D

James The Archer
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Re: Mad people with handgonnes

Post by James The Archer »

kayleaeloise wrote:well i would hope that in the event that i became lax about gunning ( i seriously hope not but as has been said people can become complacent) that someone would give me a swift kick up the *rse (well mabye not literally) :D
Oooo so temp..... :D
Duck the arrows are coming!

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Captain Reech
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Re: Mad people with handgonnes

Post by Captain Reech »

Fox wrote:I wonder where the method [in the second video] of loading from a sealed cartridge, then piecing the cartridge down the touch hole after ramming, comes from...
It doesn't seem a likely historical solution to me....
I seem to remember an illustration of Burgundian hand gunners loading from a box of what looks like pre rolled cartridges and at least one of them appears to have a powder horn/gourd for priming (I'll have to have a dig when I get home) but I don't think it actually shows the method of loading. It does sound like a field gun technique adapted for handgunning (Although the argument could be that the early pole gun was simply a very small artillery piece that then developed into a personal weapon)
"When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."
Edmund Burke(1729 – 1797)
Proof that being "Conservative" wasn't always a bad thing.....

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Fox
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Re: Mad people with handgonnes

Post by Fox »

Captain Reech wrote:I seem to remember an illustration of Burgundian hand gunners loading from a box of what looks like pre rolled cartridges and at least one of them appears to have a powder horn/gourd for priming (I'll have to have a dig when I get home)
Thank you.
I think I've seen a picture with a appostles drawn from a box; I'd be interested to see if there's enough detail to tell the difference.

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Captain Reech
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Re: Mad people with handgonnes

Post by Captain Reech »

Still digging for the illustration (I need to be more organised) but, whilst stumbling amongst the files, I found a Dragon article with reference to a source which mentions ramming a paper cartridge hard enough to burst it. It also mentions these being used in handguns (I'm sure this was the illustration I'm looking for, I seem to remember I found it after looking up references quoted in one of Gerry Embletons books)

The description of cartridge construction sounds so like the process we use for reenactment that I'm suprised gunners don't sit and roll their cartridges as part of the LH display! (OK, I appreciate the health and safety reasons but, in the right circumstances it might be workable)

http://www.companie-of-st-george.ch/cms ... agon-7.pdf

It also mentions in passing the hammering in of wooden tompions when preparing charges for breech loaders, although without citing a historical source. I'm assuming this was to protect the preloaded charge so a number of loaded breeches could be carried ready for instant deployment rather than to compress the powder, a watertight fit would be required to ensure the powder remained dry which would explain why a mallet would be needed. (sorry if that was obvious, I can't help being a pedant!)
"When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle."
Edmund Burke(1729 – 1797)
Proof that being "Conservative" wasn't always a bad thing.....

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