Fluting

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wyldstallions
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Fluting

Postby wyldstallions » Fri Jan 22, 2010 3:22 pm

Does anybody know when armour started to have flutes, is it purely a 15th century thing or did they have any earlier. I'm making some armour for next season quite fancy putting some fluting in it but I wanted to make sure it was historically accurate first.



Stuart Quayle
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Re: Fluting

Postby Stuart Quayle » Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:26 pm

I have a Cervelliere (fluted bascinet) which is a copy of Sir John d'Aubernon's helmet - circa 1340AD, so fluted definitely in evidence at that period of time on English manufactured armour.



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Brother Ranulf
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Re: Fluting

Postby Brother Ranulf » Sat Jan 23, 2010 12:17 pm

Fluting on helmets was known in the 12th century (obviously plate armour didn't exist at that stage), perhaps with Byzantine or middle eastern influences.

A knight in a well-defined fluted nasal helmet appears on a sculpted stone capitol (circa 1150) at Notre-Dame-du-Port, Clermont-Ferrand in France; the lost grave effigy of William Clito (died 1127, known from a 16th century sketch) shows him wearing a helmet with fluting; the future king Richard's first seal (in use 1169 to 1189) shows a fluted nasal helm (later seals show plain helmets); Siculo-Norman and Italian knights are occasionally depicted wearing fluted helmets in the mid-12th century, sometimes with an integral neck-guard. An example is the marble candlestick of around 1170 at San Paolo fuori la Mura, Rome, showing a group of Italian knights in both plain and fluted nasal helms.

My guess would be that this was a Mediterranean fashion (Richard's sister Johanna married William II, king of Sicily, which may explain the helmet associated with his seal) which never really took off in England until much later.


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wyldstallions
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Re: Fluting

Postby wyldstallions » Sat Jan 23, 2010 2:05 pm

Great thanks for information Stuart and Ranulf. I'll have to write all that down



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Re: Fluting

Postby House of De Clifford » Tue Jan 08, 2013 2:55 pm

Just found this thread! bit late i know but...Stuart refers to the Cervelliere as a fluted helmet, it was my impression that this was a simple skuul cap type of helmet and certainly not fluted. Also, if one studies the effigy of Gronw Tudur (Fychan) (d:1383?) in St Gredifael Church, Penmynydd, he is clearly wearing a fluted bascinet which still shows remarkable detail.
Dave.


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Stuart Quayle
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Re: Fluting

Postby Stuart Quayle » Tue Jan 08, 2013 9:01 pm

Wow! this is an old thread. I think I meant fluted bascinet, which I did put in brackets. From what I have heard since, Cervelliere could mean simply the lining inside a bascinet, so sorry for the confusion on that point. :$

Stuart



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Re: Fluting

Postby Mark Griffin » Sat Jan 12, 2013 9:42 pm

You are right Stuart. It's a lining, not the helmet itself :P :rock:


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