just a questions

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ка&am
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just a questions

Postby ка&am » Sun Jun 07, 2009 10:56 am

how do mens clothes work in thew 15th century? i'm trying to find out this whole hose being held up stuff can anyone explain this?



Thomas Hayman
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Postby Thomas Hayman » Sun Jun 07, 2009 11:37 am

Apparently, previous statement not good enough. :-)

Let me rephrase. A doublet that is worn over a shirt is pointed (tied) via small woven ties to your hose (trousers).


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Sir Thomas Hylton
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Postby Sir Thomas Hylton » Sun Jun 07, 2009 6:52 pm

The doublet pointed... & The Hose Pointed....

To further clarify, as I had to read that post twice myself Thomas

EDIT: Now that previous statement has been reworded, now no need for my clarification 8)
Last edited by Sir Thomas Hylton on Sun Jun 07, 2009 8:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.



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Postby Thomas Hayman » Sun Jun 07, 2009 7:05 pm

I don't know about you, i meant the previous statement i had typed was proven wrong so i removed it :-)

Did you mean you had to re-read mine or the original posters?


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Sir Thomas Hylton
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Postby Sir Thomas Hylton » Sun Jun 07, 2009 8:19 pm

Oh & I had to re-read yours Thomas

Knowing what the answer was & what you had meant, but at first read it reads all wrong.

Hence my clarification to a) back up what you were saying Thomas... & b) to give clarity to a statement that could be read two ways. Nice that it was Edited, will edit mine in turn.
Last edited by Sir Thomas Hylton on Sun Jun 07, 2009 8:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.



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Postby Thomas Hayman » Sun Jun 07, 2009 8:21 pm

Oh my!


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ка&am
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Postby ка&am » Sun Jun 07, 2009 11:01 pm

hmmm all that aside, how do you go to the loo - with difficulty? cheers



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Postby Thomas Hayman » Mon Jun 08, 2009 12:25 am

Some forethought is required but many find it easier to undo the front of the doublet and slide that off. This saves undoing and redoing a lot of points.


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Karen Larsdatter
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Re: just a questions

Postby Karen Larsdatter » Mon Jun 08, 2009 5:13 am

You can see some different ways of tying the hose up at http://larsdatter.com/hose.htm too. (Scroll down to the section that says "Joined Hose for Men.") In some cases (especially where the man is working in a manner that requires him to bend at the waist quite a lot) the back is loose or not tied at all.



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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Mon Jun 08, 2009 1:04 pm

I take mine off like a baby grow, a tricky task inside a turdis but one you get used to.
Of course if you are pre 1440's you could always just roll your hose down your legs and claim you have camp fevers.


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Postby ка&am » Mon Jun 08, 2009 3:37 pm

hmm this sound doable - thanks guys!



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Postby ка&am » Mon Jun 08, 2009 3:38 pm

hmm this sound doable - thanks guys!



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Postby ка&am » Mon Jun 08, 2009 3:41 pm

have just bought a book about medieval clothes - because knowledge is power!



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Postby mally ley » Mon Jun 08, 2009 7:34 pm

As long as it's the Medieval Tailor's Assistant, you'll be ok.



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Postby Nigel » Mon Jun 08, 2009 7:34 pm

and which one


There’s a country in Europe where they treat their ex soldiers with pride no waits for medical treatment after injuries received during service, no amensia from the government. Cant for the life of me recall where it is but I know exactly where it is not.

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Postby ка&am » Mon Jun 08, 2009 9:33 pm

medieval clothes and how to recreate them - or something like that



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Postby Laffin Jon Terris » Mon Jun 08, 2009 9:50 pm

ка&am wrote:have just bought a book about medieval clothes - because knowledge is power!


Ah, in this case a little knowledge can be a dangerous thing.

Definately get your hands on the Medieval Tailors Assistant, the best book for making medieval kit IMHO

JonT


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Alice the Huswyf
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Postby Alice the Huswyf » Tue Jun 09, 2009 8:30 am

"Medieval Costume And How To Recreate It" by Dorothy Hartley was first pubished in 1931, but unlike the Herbert costume series, she does not restyle her line drawings to contemporary taste, uses lots of original illustrations and then recreates the clothing from those illustrations on photographic plates - and does it well!

She has a considered style which makes her work very approachable and was interested in the practical application of her research (possibly the reason why she communicates so well).

It is a book I rate and would buy, but I suggest you use it as an adjunct to The Medieval Tailor's Assitant (The Medieval Tailor's Assitant Making Common Garments 1200 - 1500 by Sarah Thursfield ISBN 0-903585-32-4) as it does not extend to the late medieval / WOTR period consistently or as completely. The Tailor's Assitant is also a dedicated step by step period dressmaking manual with some history, whereas the Hartley book approaches the making-up from the historical background and usage first.

Great for lower status high medieval, though not so good if you are doing Wars of the Roses (WOTR) as Hartley's interest lies in the earlier late C14th / early C15th. There is no separation (as unfortunately still now from time to time) with the nationality of clothing illustrated - which does make a difference - and you do get some illustrations of transitional early tudor men's styles mixed in with WOTR (but again you get that with modern 'research'). I don't hold with the suggestion of bust darts and pieced waistlines in the earlier burgundian gown but - hey - not bad for a book competing with 78 years of further finds and research!

And no, she did not issue anything under the pseudonymic 'J.R.' We all know he was an old bloke in a tweed hat - 'cos we saw him on the TV...........



PS [Note there is also a book called "The Tudor Tailor - reconstructing sixteenth Century Dress by Jane Malcolm-Davies Ninya Mikhaila" another excellent book hence Nigel's warning "which one?" ]



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Postby ка&am » Tue Jun 09, 2009 11:04 am

The Medieval Tailor's Assitant sounds like the book to get - off on amazon



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Alice the Huswyf
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Postby Alice the Huswyf » Tue Jun 09, 2009 2:30 pm

I do not know why I stated that the Hartley book is one that I would buy, especially as I as was referring to my copy as I made the above post :mrgreen:

I rate it that much - but I just don't do the main periods covered.



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Postby Nigel » Tue Jun 09, 2009 7:28 pm

yes med tailors assaistant


There’s a country in Europe where they treat their ex soldiers with pride no waits for medical treatment after injuries received during service, no amensia from the government. Cant for the life of me recall where it is but I know exactly where it is not.

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Postby Colin Middleton » Wed Jun 10, 2009 12:38 pm

You can learn a bit more about the tailor's assistant and it's auther on her website: http://www.sarahthursfield.com.

If you're using this book, I'd recomend first reading it cover to cover, or at least, reading all teh introduction section before looking at the individual sections of the book and read the whole of that section, not just the parter that you want. The book makes a hell of a lot more sense if you appraoch it that way, rather than just dip in and out, as there is a lot of referring to other sections so as not to repeat herself.

But, yes, I'd recomend the MTA.


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Colin Middleton
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Postby Colin Middleton » Wed Jun 10, 2009 12:44 pm

I forgot to say when you're cutting your joined (closed) hosen, the join (between your legs) is RIGHT up into your groin. If you cut it down between your legs like modern trousers, they'll rip. Look at bull-fighters costume to see how close it should fit.


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Postby Thrud » Wed Jun 10, 2009 2:16 pm

Toilet...

As soon as you feel the first twinge of a poo pang, head off to the loo, never leave it until the last minute. There is nothing worse than panicy undoing of knotted points while doing the poo prevention dance in a porta-loo.

Also remember to roll your doublet up and fold it into your hose before you sit down otherwise it will trail in all the horrors on the floor and you will then smear them up your back when putting the doublet back on.


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By the sacred toenail clippings of J.R.R Tolkein... You'll pay for that hellspawn!


I am a snob and I am proud of it but I also like a good poo joke every now and then too.

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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Wed Jun 10, 2009 3:56 pm

Thus speaketh the voice of experience.


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Postby ка&am » Wed Jun 10, 2009 4:54 pm

scary stuff...



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Alice the Huswyf
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Postby Alice the Huswyf » Thu Jun 11, 2009 5:29 pm

No - having an argument with our wife and then realising she is goin g to shortly be fitting you bodily for a hose toile is scarey stuff....... :twisted:



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Postby Thrud » Thu Jun 11, 2009 5:31 pm

I would rather a hundred pins in the backs of my legs than the dribbly runs and knotted points.


The panic alone is dreadful.


By the sacred toenail clippings of J.R.R Tolkein... You'll pay for that hellspawn!


I am a snob and I am proud of it but I also like a good poo joke every now and then too.

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Postby guthrie » Thu Jun 11, 2009 5:42 pm

There is a reason people carry a sharp eating knife with them.

Not that I've needed it.



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Postby ка&am » Thu Jun 11, 2009 7:19 pm

that explains why




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