Robin Hood "Discovered" at Eton

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Brother Ranulf
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Robin Hood "Discovered" at Eton

Postby Brother Ranulf » Sat Mar 14, 2009 11:13 am

Some people may not have seen this news piece, which I found tucked away in this morning's Mail:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/edi ... 941504.stm

A few initial thoughts struck me -

Julian Luxford is claimed to have discovered the manuscript "buried" in Eton College library. In fact the Polychronicon has been catalogued and filed correctly for a very long time. The truth is that nobody bothered to read it and the suggestion that it was in any way lost is bogus.

Second, the manuscript was written around 1380 and makes no mention of Robin Hood anywhere at any time. It is a later marginal note by an unnamed monk (around 1460) which mentions Robyn Hode. This note was therefore written some 80 years after the manuscript - and it refers to an even earlier period (the reign of Edward I). The monk was thus referring to a period some 200 years before he himself was born and he and his contemporaries can have had no first hand knowledge of those times.

The actual entry begins "Around this time, according to popular opinion . . . . ." This makes it clear that he was not stating fact or anything remotely like it - he was repeating popular folklore current at the time (1460). The Robin Hood stories were already legend/fable/myth/fairytales by then and taking what the monk wrote as any kind of reliable evidence is several hundred steps too far. None of this proves the existence of a real Robin Hood, nor does it set a reliable time frame if he did indeed exist.

It is simply significant as a mention of a popular folk character, not as fact or historical truth.



:roll:


Brother Ranulf

"Patres nostri et nos hanc insulam in brevi edomuimus in brevi nostris subdidimus legibus, nostris obsequiis mancipavimus" - Walter Espec 1138

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Laffin Jon Terris
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Postby Laffin Jon Terris » Sat Mar 14, 2009 7:39 pm

With the church being among the rich of the period -along with most of the other folks in the "able to read and write" set- I would have thought it more likey they would be against Robin Hood and his financial scheme!

I'm not claiming (or accepting) wether or not he did (or didn't) exist but is this not like finding one piece of German news from 1939 and deciding that it proves Hitler was the good guy?

JonT


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Simon Atford
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Postby Simon Atford » Sat Mar 14, 2009 9:12 pm

Probbally worthwhile finding the full article in the Journal of Medieval History as iit is judge the merits of this discovery given on the Beebs news site.

What about the claim that a 'real' Robin (or Robert) Hode lived during the reign of Edward II and was part of Lancaster's rebellion :?:



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behanner
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Postby behanner » Sun Mar 15, 2009 3:04 pm

In several early Robin Hood stories Monks are kinda the bad guys so not totally surprising. What is interesting is that to my knowledge it is the earliest mention that tells us which Edward is the King Edward in the tales.



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zauberdachs
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Postby zauberdachs » Wed Mar 18, 2009 3:30 pm

Usual media hype, as stated above I'd wait to see the article.


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glyndwr 50
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The real Robin Hood

Postby glyndwr 50 » Fri Jun 12, 2009 11:57 pm

I have read many books over the years ,and have seen all the films made .The silent ones with Douglas Fairbanks right up to the Prince of thieves .And every one has some diffrence ,some have no maid Marion ,some change the story line .Surely there must be a first account of the story or legend when it was first put down in words.The film makers twist the tale nearly every time a new version is made.Is there any one out there who knows the original first version ,or is it a multitude of tales all woven into one over the years with bits added or in some cases taken out ...



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Brother Ranulf
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Postby Brother Ranulf » Sat Jun 13, 2009 11:05 am

It's the "multitude of tales all woven into one", and over a very long time period.

These stories were being told long before they were written down, in many different parts of the country (hence the supporters of "Scottish Robin Hood") and with different characters, different themes and different agendas.

See the very comprehensive
http://www.robinhood.ltd.uk/robinhood/legend.html

and look out for a number of books on the subject by Richard Rutherford-Moore (yes, he's the same chap who acted as trainer and adviser on the Sharpe TV series). He is one of the leading experts on the Robin Hood legends and possibly knows more about medieval outlaws than is healthy.

Amazon carry his books, but they seem to be awaiting more stock at present:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Legend-Robin-Ho ... 537&sr=1-4


Brother Ranulf



"Patres nostri et nos hanc insulam in brevi edomuimus in brevi nostris subdidimus legibus, nostris obsequiis mancipavimus" - Walter Espec 1138


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