Questions about reenacting a Gallowglass

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Nils
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Questions about reenacting a Gallowglass

Postby Nils » Tue Dec 02, 2008 5:50 pm

Hi, I haven't posted on these forums yet but I was told by a friend of mine I could do some research regarding our re-enacting exploits here.

The period we are aiming for is between 1300 and 1340 AD.

I'm portraying a Gallowglass and prefer using two handed swords. I've been wondering what type of gloves would be okay to use with a typically light armored warrior such as these. I suppose any type of leather or chain mail gloves would suffice, But I'm wondering which material offers the best protection for the hands. Point is I'm not portraying a overly rich person, so which would be okay, and what materials are historically correct for the period?

Also, which were the most common occupations for these warriors to have aside from their mercenary enterprises? For now I was thinking either Fishing or Farming, but do any of you have any pointers as to where I could find some good info regarding this matter?



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Neil of Ormsheim
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Postby Neil of Ormsheim » Tue Dec 02, 2008 6:01 pm

As a "Vikings" combatant, I would recomend 6 or 8mm thick sole-type leather (even if in multiple layers) sewn onto the backs of the gloves. It is lighter than maille and offers jsut as much, if not better protection.

I am currently experimenting with one thickness of camping sleeping mat disguised with cloth on the backs of gloves, inital impresions are that this is going to have to be supplimented by either a second layer or 3 or 4mm of leather. The gloves are extremely light but the sleeping mat by itselk does not give enough protection.

Some of our people use street hockey gloves either backed with leather or inside appropriately disguised welding gauntlets. I also knoe people who use modified cricket gloves.


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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Tue Dec 02, 2008 6:22 pm

Sorry I got excited 'cos i thought it read Gallowgate.


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zauberdachs
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Postby zauberdachs » Tue Dec 02, 2008 10:33 pm

To be honest you'd probably be best to post on the Irish living history for specifics like this. There are some very serious Galloglas re-enactors over there.

Incidentally, wasn't it axes that Galloglas were well known for in this period?


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Re: Questions about reenacting a Gallowglass

Postby Alan_F » Tue Dec 02, 2008 10:58 pm

Nils wrote:Also, which were the most common occupations for these warriors to have aside from their mercenary enterprises? For now I was thinking either Fishing or Farming, but do any of you have any pointers as to where I could find some good info regarding this matter?


Being a Gallowglass WAS their occupation: Few were mercenaries (in the Medieval period at least). They were pretty much a Scottish Warrior Caste in their own right and, as noblemen, I doubt they would have had an occupation like fishing or farming.

Edited to add: Where have you been getting your information from?


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Re: Questions about reenacting a Gallowglass

Postby Phil the Grips » Tue Dec 02, 2008 11:29 pm

Nils wrote:I'm portraying a Gallowglass and prefer using two handed swords.
Two handed swords with the distinctive ring-pommel were known yet the axe is the signature weapon of these men

I've been wondering what type of gloves would be okay to use with a typically light armored warrior such as these.

None- if you are being historically accurate.

I suppose any type of leather or chain mail gloves would suffice,
They should be enough and excusable- pad under the mail though and put cotton wool in the fingertips to stop them getting squashed.


But I'm wondering which material offers the best protection for the hands.
Plate metal- but not an option for you at this dateline and portrayal.

Point is I'm not portraying a overly rich person,
Then why a portrayal of professional soldier earning a relatively high wage? Surely you mean you wish to be a Kern if you are being relatively unwealthy and are on a limited budget.

Also, which were the most common occupations for these warriors to have aside from their mercenary enterprises?
drinking, fighting, entertaining, relaxing, training, land management, cattle management, cattle theft, seeking out a decent marriage, debt collecting- pretty much the same as any other agriculturally based upper class through the ages.

A Kern would be a household servant of varying income and/or a farmer type called into fighting service.[/quote]


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Postby Chris, yclept John Barber » Wed Dec 03, 2008 1:10 pm

Neil of Ormsheim wrote:Some of our people use street hockey gloves...


Off topic, but do you know a source of street-hockey gloves? I've been using a pair for years in practice and find them to be great protection (no way they could be made to look authenti though!), but I need a new pair, and a lot of our group really need something similar.


Of course he has a knife. He always has a knife. We all have knives - it's 1183 and we're barbarians.

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Neil of Ormsheim
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Postby Neil of Ormsheim » Wed Dec 03, 2008 6:30 pm

Sorry Chris, lost the suppliers address last time I cleaned out my in box. Wont google do it?


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Postby House of De Clifford » Thu Dec 04, 2008 8:39 am

max from freedom enterprise and phil stagman make fantastic leather gauntlets etc..

Dave.


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Chris, yclept John Barber
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Postby Chris, yclept John Barber » Thu Dec 04, 2008 1:35 pm

Neil of Ormsheim wrote:Sorry Chris, lost the suppliers address last time I cleaned out my in box. Wont google do it?


I didn't have any success last time I tried. There were a few hits, but none of the gloves looked as substantial as the ones I'm using.

Maybe it's time to try again...

Thanks anyway,


Of course he has a knife. He always has a knife. We all have knives - it's 1183 and we're barbarians.

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Postby WorkMonkey » Sun Dec 07, 2008 3:45 pm

Weren't Gallowglasses, as already mentioned, the nobility, or atleast household troops of a local noble? and not...fishermen?


Don't know much about Irish military history though :?


As for gloves, sheepskin or leather base, with padding and leather stitched on top to keep it in. Dont do mail gloves. They dont work.


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Postby Alan_F » Sun Dec 07, 2008 6:10 pm

WorkMonkey wrote:Weren't Gallowglasses, as already mentioned, the nobility, or atleast household troops of a local noble? and not...fishermen?


Don't know much about Irish military history though :?


As for gloves, sheepskin or leather base, with padding and leather stitched on top to keep it in. Dont do mail gloves. They dont work.


They were nobles. They also stem from Scottish history, many galloglas going to fight for the Irish kings due to Clan loyalties/treaties, but originally they came from Scotland


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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Sun Dec 07, 2008 7:02 pm

I thought a lot wnet over as part of marriage arrangements between those who had family over the water. I never saw them as a Irish thing at all.


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Postby zauberdachs » Sun Dec 07, 2008 8:52 pm

I think when you are looking at men of the isles labels like "Scottish", "Irish" or "Norse" are pretty useless in this period. They are something of all.

However modern re-enactment wise the study has been taken a lot further in Ireland as far as I am aware than it is in the UK.


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Postby Frodo » Mon Dec 29, 2008 8:40 am

Try looking on Living History.ie.
However a few points, youve picked a tricky timeline for your "gallowglass" they really only began to appear as you imagine them in the late 15thC, as in big skirts and ring pommeled two handers...
As gallowglass just means foreign warrior its often quite open to interpretation.

For your time period invest in a Leine with narrow sleeves(battle dress the precursor to the kilt by a few centuries). Probably a good padded jack and do your resaerch on whatever weapon you want to use.
Aim your sights at a two handed axe or spear as to the best of my knowledge the earliest dated found examples of ring pommels and big Irish two handers is the 16th century. However some swords are depicted on gallowglass images from earlier periods.

A good starting point for this later interpretation would be the dreaded osprey Irish Wars book, although COMPLETELY IGNORE the central painted plates as they are as authentic as pathfinder, however it has some of Deurers early woodblock prints and a few examples of weapons to start from.

Hope this has been helpful but as I said take a good look at http://livinghistory.ie/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=171 for some good information if a little too detailed at times.



I Dev
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re-enacting the Galloglas

Postby I Dev » Tue Jan 06, 2009 8:49 pm

Try the Book Galloglas ISBN no 1-86232-251-1




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