What kind of horse?

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Colin Middleton
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What kind of horse?

Postby Colin Middleton » Mon Nov 24, 2008 1:47 pm

I've been reading the Howard Accounts and a section in there has sparked a bit of a debate between Chris and I, but neither of us knows enough about the horse in medieval England to make much sense out of some of the things we're seeing.

Sir John Howard is taking some of his people with him to the North of England and he has loaned some of them horses. This has turned up a few words that we don't understand:
Throston Par on bayard Kauser.

We're guessing that a bayard is a type of horse and that Kauser is it's name. But we've no idea what a bayard is! Can anyone offer any guidance? :?

and I rode my selfe on lyard Hewes.

Similarly lyard? Is it a type of horse? I have a nasty feeling that I saw it a few pages earlier applied to a person :shock: . Is it a spelling of Lord? If so, why is his horse called Lord Hewes? :?

Help please.


Colin

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Gandi
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Postby Gandi » Mon Nov 24, 2008 2:39 pm



Now there's two kinds of wet in my pants!

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MadWoman
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Postby MadWoman » Mon Nov 24, 2008 6:04 pm

Would Kauser be an alternative spelling of courser?



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Postby Fair Lady Aside » Wed Nov 26, 2008 6:29 pm

Bayard = Bay

And the other is an alternate spelling for Courser. I'm sure you've noticed that no spelling is standardized.

I've gone through that entire document specifically for equestrian items.



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Colin Middleton
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Postby Colin Middleton » Thu Nov 27, 2008 2:21 pm

Between the above answers and those on http://livinghistory.co.uk/forums/viewtopic.php?p=225216#225216, I think I understand now.

Thanks for the help.


Colin

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