Pilgrimage Badge - Gloucester Cathedral/Edward II tomb

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Ghost
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Pilgrimage Badge - Gloucester Cathedral/Edward II tomb

Postby Ghost » Mon Apr 21, 2008 1:20 pm

Does anyone out there know what the badge looked like for pilgrims visiting Gloucester Cathedral and the tomb of Edward II ?


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Allan Harley
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Postby Allan Harley » Mon Apr 21, 2008 1:58 pm

Its likely to be something related to the original Chursh _ St Peters or St Oswalds Priory

Can anyone help with this?


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Karen Larsdatter
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Re: Pilgrimage Badge - Gloucester Cathedral/Edward II tomb

Postby Karen Larsdatter » Mon Apr 21, 2008 2:51 pm

I didn't think there were many pilgrimage badges for the tombs of kings who weren't also saints. Kunera has several Edward the Confessor pilgrim badges, none for Edward II.



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Brother Ranulf
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Postby Brother Ranulf » Mon Apr 21, 2008 3:22 pm

The only pilgrim item I have seen definitely attributed to Gloucester is the usual lead ampulla - a flask-shaped pendant meant to contain holy water.


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Mick,M
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Postby Mick,M » Mon Apr 21, 2008 4:53 pm

one large red hot poker on a field of steaming piles!!!!!!!!!!!!! :lol:



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Allan Harley
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Postby Allan Harley » Mon Apr 21, 2008 8:48 pm

Just wondered - as it does have a pilgrims gate.

And if nothing else - red hot poker, very sad. Well the thought brings tears to my eyes


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Allan Harley
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Postby Allan Harley » Mon Apr 21, 2008 8:59 pm

St. Oswald's body, which had originally been buried on the field of battle, was dug up by his neice, Queen Osthryth of Mercia, and translated to Bardney Abbey in Lincolnshire some time in the 680s or 90s. The story goes that the Mercian monks were not over-keen to welcome an old enemy who had imposed his rule on them not so many years before. The bones arrived at their gates on a cart, but they refused them entry until persuaded by an unquestionable miracle. Having been accepted, the relics were washed and the water poured away into a corner of the sacristy. They were finally enshrined in a fine feretory and covered with the King's gold and purple standard. Not only this shrine, but also the dust from the dust from the floor of the sacristy, became the source of many miracles and a popular destination for pilgrims. The feretory became covered in gold and silver and was bejewelled by King Offa of Mercia.

Thus the Bardney monks learnt to become quite attached to their profitable acquisition; and, in the days of Norse piracy, were obliged to resort to all sorts of expedients for the preservation of such a treasure. The feretory was even saved from marauding Danes by Prior Aethelwold secreting it in the straw of his bed. It was because of such attacks that, in AD 909, St. Oswald's remains were again translated by Queen Aelflaed of Mercia (daughter and ally of King Alfred the Great), to St. Peter's Priory in Gloucester, thenceforth known as St. Oswald's, where his shrine was a conspicuous object of veneration until the sixteenth century.

So who knows what was his device/badge?


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Postby Cat » Mon Apr 21, 2008 10:42 pm

I can go in and ask, but not 'til next week.
I work about 20 minutes walk away.


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Allan Harley
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Postby Allan Harley » Tue Apr 22, 2008 2:25 pm

You are a love


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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Tue Apr 22, 2008 11:16 pm

I've not found anything that makes Gloucester a major site or centre of devotion. If anything it appears as a starting point or a stop over point along the pilgrimage routes towards St. David's (Two to st. david's is worth one to Rome), Glastonbury, Walsingham and that place down Kent way. This doesn't mean it didn't recieve it's share of fame but it's not a "biggee" on the must do list of medieval pilgrimages.


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Jenn
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Postby Jenn » Wed Apr 23, 2008 11:29 am

The English didn't kill kings often and when they did they felt really bad about it so Edward the second's tomb was important.
Pilgrims could also visit the Abbey of Hailes (about three miles away) which had some of Christ's blood
and then on to Hereford to go to the tomb of Thomas Cantilupe.



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Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Wed Apr 23, 2008 8:20 pm

Which is why i said that gloucester was usually just the starting point or the layover point for bigger and better things. i mean who wants to bother with a dead king (and even in the 14th century there were those who suspected it wasn't Edwards body in the tomb) when you can see real living Jesus blood!!!!!!!!


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Laffin Jon Terris
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Postby Laffin Jon Terris » Thu Apr 24, 2008 9:19 am

Allan Harley wrote: The bones arrived at their gates on a cart, but they refused them entry until persuaded by an unquestionable miracle. Having been accepted, the relics were washed and the water poured away into a corner of the sacristy.


So, what was the unquestionable miracle?


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