Medieval Soldier database

Moderator: Moderators

User avatar
Phil the Grips
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 2000
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2005 2:01 pm
Location: Auld Reekie- capital village o' Jockland
Contact:

Medieval Soldier database

Postby Phil the Grips » Sat Nov 17, 2007 12:33 pm

http://www.medievalsoldier.org/

Might be of interest to some.


--Angels also carry weapons--
http://www.blackboarswordsmanship.co.uk/

User avatar
John Waller
Post Knight
Posts: 1551
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2005 1:36 pm
Location: Surrey

Postby John Waller » Sat Nov 17, 2007 12:57 pm

John Waller, Man-at-arms, Captain - Talbot, Gilbert, Sir , Commander -Buckingham, Thomas of Woodstock, earl of, 1377-1378

b**ger I'm in Oxfords! Very interesting project.


Those who live by the sword get shot by those who don't.

Catherine of Gwent
Posts: 148
Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 8:05 pm
Contact:

Postby Catherine of Gwent » Sat Nov 17, 2007 6:51 pm

Searched Horton in the surname field, and got 22 hits, mostly archers and a couple of men at arms.

How fascinating!



Nigel
Post Knight
Posts: 1677
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 7:45 am
Location: Pontefract
Contact:

Postby Nigel » Sat Nov 17, 2007 8:40 pm

Bloodu hundreds of Waltons no Fenwicks now that is strange


There’s a country in Europe where they treat their ex soldiers with pride no waits for medical treatment after injuries received during service, no amensia from the government. Cant for the life of me recall where it is but I know exactly where it is not.

User avatar
John Waller
Post Knight
Posts: 1551
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2005 1:36 pm
Location: Surrey

Postby John Waller » Sat Nov 17, 2007 9:55 pm

Nigel wrote:Bloodu hundreds of Waltons no Fenwicks now that is strange


Too busy cattle rustling to join up!


Those who live by the sword get shot by those who don't.

User avatar
Phil the Grips
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 2000
Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2005 2:01 pm
Location: Auld Reekie- capital village o' Jockland
Contact:

Postby Phil the Grips » Sun Nov 18, 2007 12:12 am

or establishing department stores...


--Angels also carry weapons--
http://www.blackboarswordsmanship.co.uk/

Nigel
Post Knight
Posts: 1677
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 7:45 am
Location: Pontefract
Contact:

Postby Nigel » Sun Nov 18, 2007 10:44 am

True very true


There’s a country in Europe where they treat their ex soldiers with pride no waits for medical treatment after injuries received during service, no amensia from the government. Cant for the life of me recall where it is but I know exactly where it is not.

User avatar
John Waller
Post Knight
Posts: 1551
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2005 1:36 pm
Location: Surrey

Postby John Waller » Sun Nov 18, 2007 10:57 am

Actually they are there disguised as Fenwyc & Fenwyk. The Fenwyk's serving under a Percy so they must be the cattle rustling haberdasher branch of the name.


Those who live by the sword get shot by those who don't.

User avatar
Fillionous
Posts: 61
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2005 3:16 pm
Location: West Berkshire
Contact:

Postby Fillionous » Sun Nov 18, 2007 11:03 am

Good database...

Great for fleshing out charictors or just getting a feel for names, stations and make up of forces...
Or being ego driven and looking up your own name!

Be bright, be bold
Fillionous


Orathanni tal ka Zarness - Blessings of the Stars
http://shieldmaiden.co.uk - for heraldry, shields and banners.

User avatar
Malvoisin
Posts: 275
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2005 11:02 am
Location: Bulewelle

Postby Malvoisin » Sun Nov 18, 2007 2:09 pm

Wow! 49 Walkers 8)
Although I can imagine some names are the same person mustering at different places at dfferent times.

What's "keeping of the sea" regards an archer under "Neville, John Lord" 1371? A sailor?


Satisfying the Bloodlust of the Masses... In peacetime

User avatar
Alan E
Posts: 327
Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 10:18 am
Location: Somewhere in Southern Wales now (unless elsewhere)

Postby Alan E » Mon Nov 19, 2007 9:38 am

Malvoisin wrote:Wow! 49 Walkers 8)
Although I can imagine some names are the same person mustering at different places at dfferent times.

What's "keeping of the sea" regards an archer under "Neville, John Lord" 1371? A sailor?

Difficult to be sure without a field telling us where they were to serve, but my guess is this means protecting the coast. At various times those within specified distance of the coast were exempt from 'foreign' service (anywhere outside their county) because the coast had tobe protected.


'till whispers fill the tower of memory...
The Exiles Company of Medieval Martial Artists: http://the-exiles.org.uk/

Now teaching Fiore's art in Ceredigion (Felinfach) - pm for details

Mark Griffin
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 4240
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2005 2:28 pm
Location: Wales. Only just!
Contact:

Postby Mark Griffin » Mon Nov 19, 2007 10:17 am

Bloomin heck.

There we are, under the early English form of the name. And hey ho, serving my local Lord. I have the permission of His Grace the Duke of Norfolk to wear the FitzAllan badge of the Earls of Arundel so how fitting is that!

Mark Gryffyn


http://www.griffinhistorical.com. A delicious decadent historical trifle. Thick performance jelly topped with lashings of imaginative creamy custard. You may also get a soggy event management sponge finger but it won't cost you hundreds and thousands.

User avatar
gregory23b
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 2923
Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2005 9:46 pm
Location: Gyppeswyk, Suffolk

Postby gregory23b » Mon Nov 19, 2007 10:23 am

As I can't find one with any of my names, there is an aptly named

George Trumpour - which suits me just fine :D

Is is possible that some of the names are of the same person, but with the usual idiosyncratic spelling? Seems very coincidental that you get varieties of the same names on the same expeditions. I have not read the whole intro for the site, so forgive.


middle english dictionary

Isabela on G23b "...somehow more approachable in real life"

http://medievalcolours.blogspot.com

"I know my place." Alice the Huswyf

Mark Griffin
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 4240
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2005 2:28 pm
Location: Wales. Only just!
Contact:

Postby Mark Griffin » Mon Nov 19, 2007 10:42 am

Yes, 'I'm' in there twice. Same captain, same Lord, same document. Would have thought its the same person. I'd need to see the document of course to see what the context was.

Also got two in the standing force in Gascony under John Neville so I'm presuming Edward and lawrence are brothers or father and son.


http://www.griffinhistorical.com. A delicious decadent historical trifle. Thick performance jelly topped with lashings of imaginative creamy custard. You may also get a soggy event management sponge finger but it won't cost you hundreds and thousands.

Marcus Woodhouse
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 3337
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2006 8:35 pm

Postby Marcus Woodhouse » Mon Nov 19, 2007 5:20 pm

I was surprised to find "Mark" under there as I had not thought it was a common English name, unlike Marco which is two a penny in medival Italy. (I'd have to be re-enacting the Romans to find Marcus a common moniker.)


OSTENDE MIHI PECUNIAM!

User avatar
gregory23b
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 2923
Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2005 9:46 pm
Location: Gyppeswyk, Suffolk

Postby gregory23b » Mon Nov 19, 2007 5:41 pm

Hah! anbd Luke. Years abck I was told that Luke was not used, haha!

The four evangelists get represented in this, hah! again.


middle english dictionary

Isabela on G23b "...somehow more approachable in real life"

http://medievalcolours.blogspot.com

"I know my place." Alice the Huswyf

Dave Key
Posts: 40
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2007 6:27 pm

Postby Dave Key » Mon Nov 19, 2007 7:27 pm

Alan E wrote:
Malvoisin wrote:Wow! 49 Walkers 8)
Although I can imagine some names are the same person mustering at different places at dfferent times.

What's "keeping of the sea" regards an archer under "Neville, John Lord" 1371? A sailor?

Difficult to be sure without a field telling us where they were to serve, but my guess is this means protecting the coast. At various times those within specified distance of the coast were exempt from 'foreign' service (anywhere outside their county) because the coast had tobe protected.


"keeping of the seas" is essentially what we'd call the Navy. Although we rarely consider the sea when talking about military roles it was crucial to medieval monarchs. Indeed much of what we know about medieval armies comes from the Black book of the Admiralty!

As well as converted merchant vessels pressed into service monarchs like Henry V had purpose bulilt warships like the Grace Dieu which lies rotting to nothing in the Hamble river near Southampton.

In 1481 Sir John Howard was charged with doing the King's service "upon the sea towards the parties of Scotland". These ships were manned by a combination of mariners (sailors) and landmen (normal soldiers, who would be principally archers just like on the land). The voyage towards Scotland in 1481 is slightly different as it was part of a specific campaign. More typical would be keeping the shipping lanes clear of 'pirates' and protecting ports from raids ... eg as the French did to Southampton in 1338 which resulted in much of the town being destroyed and lead to the wall building program which still remains.



Mark Griffin
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 4240
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2005 2:28 pm
Location: Wales. Only just!
Contact:

Postby Mark Griffin » Mon Nov 19, 2007 7:48 pm

Hi Dave!


http://www.griffinhistorical.com. A delicious decadent historical trifle. Thick performance jelly topped with lashings of imaginative creamy custard. You may also get a soggy event management sponge finger but it won't cost you hundreds and thousands.

Mark Griffin
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 4240
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2005 2:28 pm
Location: Wales. Only just!
Contact:

Postby Mark Griffin » Mon Nov 19, 2007 7:50 pm

Oh and I'll mention it for general interest before a hue and cry is raised about the fact that HenryV's warship is still about, it got struck by lightning and burnt down to the waterline. Considering the arial photographs from the 80's, there's probably not much left more's the pity.


http://www.griffinhistorical.com. A delicious decadent historical trifle. Thick performance jelly topped with lashings of imaginative creamy custard. You may also get a soggy event management sponge finger but it won't cost you hundreds and thousands.

Mark Griffin
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 4240
Joined: Wed Jul 20, 2005 2:28 pm
Location: Wales. Only just!
Contact:

Postby Mark Griffin » Mon Nov 19, 2007 8:00 pm

More here:

http://www.ukdiving.co.uk/wrecks/wreck.php?id=171

http://www.hwtma.org.uk/projects/hamble/HAM141.htm

http://www.noc.soton.ac.uk/nocs/news.ph ... ws&idx=221

last one has a good cgi reconstruction from the Time team episode on it.

Good book on the subject is 'Southampton and the Navy in the Age of Henry V
by Susan Rose (1998)'


http://www.griffinhistorical.com. A delicious decadent historical trifle. Thick performance jelly topped with lashings of imaginative creamy custard. You may also get a soggy event management sponge finger but it won't cost you hundreds and thousands.

User avatar
steve stanley
Post Knight
Posts: 1122
Joined: Wed Aug 03, 2005 6:07 pm
Location: Leicester

Postby steve stanley » Mon Nov 19, 2007 8:16 pm

Hmm...Quite a few Stanleys.....mainly in the standing force in Ireland.


"Give me a tent and a kettle
Snowshoes and axe and gun
Send me up in Grand River
Steering by star and sun".
- Labrador Trapper's Song

User avatar
gregory23b
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 2923
Joined: Sun Jul 17, 2005 9:46 pm
Location: Gyppeswyk, Suffolk

Postby gregory23b » Mon Nov 19, 2007 10:10 pm

Talking of naval actions, just a few minutes' gone I had read a paston account of a brief engagement between an English vessel on its way to Brittany, where they were spied by a French ship, in order not to frighten the Frenchman off, the men arrayed hid below decks, the Frenchman was lured in, boarded the ship and then countered by the hidden english. The French ship was taken in her turn and on board was a Scottish emissary who was in deep do do, as the Scots were in rebellion.

Oh, and Hi Dave <cooeee>


middle english dictionary

Isabela on G23b "...somehow more approachable in real life"

http://medievalcolours.blogspot.com

"I know my place." Alice the Huswyf

User avatar
Alan E
Posts: 327
Joined: Tue Jul 19, 2005 10:18 am
Location: Somewhere in Southern Wales now (unless elsewhere)

Postby Alan E » Tue Nov 20, 2007 8:21 am

Dave Key wrote:"keeping of the seas" is essentially what we'd call the Navy. Although we rarely consider the sea when talking about military roles it was crucial to medieval monarchs. Indeed much of what we know about medieval armies comes from the Black book of the Admiralty!

As well as converted merchant vessels pressed into service monarchs like Henry V had purpose bulilt warships like the Grace Dieu which lies rotting to nothing in the Hamble river near Southampton.

In 1481 Sir John Howard was charged with doing the King's service "upon the sea towards the parties of Scotland". These ships were manned by a combination of mariners (sailors) and landmen (normal soldiers, who would be principally archers just like on the land). The voyage towards Scotland in 1481 is slightly different as it was part of a specific campaign. More typical would be keeping the shipping lanes clear of 'pirates' and protecting ports from raids ... eg as the French did to Southampton in 1338 which resulted in much of the town being destroyed and lead to the wall building program which still remains.

I guessed wrong then :oops: . Where would the men for the proto-navy be recruited Dave? Apart obviously from those belonging to whoever was put in charge: Would it be locally from around the ports (presumably so for mariners, but for archers?)? And do we know how long they would have served?


'till whispers fill the tower of memory...
The Exiles Company of Medieval Martial Artists: http://the-exiles.org.uk/

Now teaching Fiore's art in Ceredigion (Felinfach) - pm for details

Dave Key
Posts: 40
Joined: Mon Sep 10, 2007 6:27 pm

Postby Dave Key » Tue Nov 20, 2007 10:41 pm

Alan E wrote:
Dave Key wrote:"keeping of the seas" is essentially what we'd call the Navy. Although we rarely consider the sea when talking about military roles it was crucial to medieval monarchs. Indeed much of what we know about medieval armies comes from the Black book of the Admiralty!

As well as converted merchant vessels pressed into service monarchs like Henry V had purpose bulilt warships like the Grace Dieu which lies rotting to nothing in the Hamble river near Southampton.

In 1481 Sir John Howard was charged with doing the King's service "upon the sea towards the parties of Scotland". These ships were manned by a combination of mariners (sailors) and landmen (normal soldiers, who would be principally archers just like on the land). The voyage towards Scotland in 1481 is slightly different as it was part of a specific campaign. More typical would be keeping the shipping lanes clear of 'pirates' and protecting ports from raids ... eg as the French did to Southampton in 1338 which resulted in much of the town being destroyed and lead to the wall building program which still remains.

I guessed wrong then :oops: . Where would the men for the proto-navy be recruited Dave? Apart obviously from those belonging to whoever was put in charge: Would it be locally from around the ports (presumably so for mariners, but for archers?)? And do we know how long they would have served?


I'll be perfectly honest and say I don't know for sure. It's a good question and links back to the whole question of 'professionals'. I know a few books, articles and PHDs have been written on the subject but I haven't read them (or at least I can't remember all they said when I did ;-) )

I would 'suspect' that the majority of the mariners were simply the usual crews and hired like any other artisan. There are interesting hints at how some of the Italian crews were organised in the Cely letters (if I recall correctly).

But as to the archers .... I'd be very surprised if they were any different to the equivilant land-based soldiery with the same recruitment, payment, service conditions. When you consider that the ordinances for War for Richard II and Henry V are both included it seems reasonable to conclude that the land based approach was entirely aplicable to a naval context. Even the description of Sir John's men as being "landmen" seems to suggest it, as would what we know of the manner of the fighting at sea.

Sorry I can't give a definitive simple answer ...

Cheers
Dave



User avatar
Colin Middleton
Absolute Wizard
Posts: 2037
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2005 12:31 pm
Location: Sheffield
Contact:

Postby Colin Middleton » Wed Nov 21, 2007 1:55 pm

I could be barking up the wrong tree (or mast) on this one, but wouldn't there be a significant number of people spending most of their time on boats as 'professional' sailors? I was under the impression that most 'warships' were actually civilian vessels 'borrowed' for the purpose, effectively turning their crews into marines for the duration. That would then give us sea going men in the household of whomever owned the ship. You suplement their numbers with 'land men' and you'll have quite a well armed vessel.

Or am I just talking rubbish now?


Colin

"May 'Blood, blood, blood' be your motto!"

Image


Return to “1100-1500”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests