Knee armour?

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RottenCad
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Post by RottenCad »

I have to say I've been looking into this recently as well. My opinion (for what little it's worth) is that the plate poleyns (being pretty small, at least for early c14) should not weigh too much - maybe a similar weight to a tasset, since they seem to be roughly the same size and shape.

They could well be pointed straight to the cuisses, without a huge strain being added to the pointing on the arming doublet or belt. What I am interested in at the moment is where should they sit? The reason I pose this is because your knees are in three different positions if you are a) standing, b) crouched en garde or c) on horseback.

Try this to see what I mean:

Stand up (clothed!), and put a finger on the middle of your kneecap. Keep your finger where it is, and sit back down. The finger travels a good 4 inches. So where to site the poleyns?

I'm hoping to construct some cuisses this weekend, and give it a bit of the old experimental archaeology - I'll keep you posted!

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Cad
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Post by Tod »

The ones I've borrowed from Dave strap around the back of the knee, and stay put when you bend, but slide when you walk. Looking at the arming hose they could be pointed to that which would be held up by a doublet. If that were the case what would the arming hose be made of? Are ther any records, I can't find any thing in the books I've got - which is not many.

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Post by zauberdachs »

RottenCad wrote:I'm hoping to construct some cuisses this weekend, and give it a bit of the old experimental archaeology - I'll keep you posted!
Does this mean the man cave is complete?
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Post by RottenCad »

No, it means you've forgotten we've got a COSM meeting at Lubka's on Sunday ...
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Post by Colin Middleton »

Tod wrote:The ones I've borrowed from Dave strap around the back of the knee, and stay put when you bend, but slide when you walk. Looking at the arming hose they could be pointed to that which would be held up by a doublet. If that were the case what would the arming hose be made of? Are ther any records, I can't find any thing in the books I've got - which is not many.
The only reference that I've seen is to a material called Stamin, which is a corse wool (I think something like blanket, but you'd have to ask on the costumes forum to get a better description).

As far as I can see, arming clothes are made just like normal work clothes, but possibly with re-enforcements or from toucher materials.
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Dave B
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Post by Dave B »

The thing is, in the illustrations they look like normal tight joined hose. I think this would only work in the normal sort of thin stretchy bias cut wool. whereas the knee armour really needs something non-stretching.

My thereory was a 'normal' pair of wool hose part lined with strong linen to just above the knee might work and be consistent with what we know?
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Post by Mark Griffin »

forgot that there are some poleyns with arming point holes in them, look on p135 of the Rhodes Armoury book. They are Spanish or Flemish and are listed as RA III.1133

There are only holes described on the lower plate though, none on the top.
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Post by Tod »

I think you are right. I used to have a pair of jeans that were re-enforced at the thigh and calf.
Time to get the needle and thread out, well not me, best get a girl to do it. I turn cloth into rag, in a magical way.
Dave I think they only need to stretchy around at the top and at the knee joint.

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Post by Dave B »

The thing I wasn't sure about is whether that re-inforcing piece would be attached to the fabric or just attached at the top like the lining in a pair of suit pants.
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